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The Do’s And Don’ts Of Student Project Collaboration Between Colleges: A Hindsight View From Two Community Colleges

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Multidisciplinary Design

Tagged Division

Multidisciplinary Engineering

Page Count

7

Page Numbers

11.1275.1 - 11.1275.7

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/549

Download Count

24

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Paper Authors

biography

Nikki Larson Edmonds Community College

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Ms. Larson is currently an assistant professor in the engineering technology department of Western Washington University. Before this appointment, she was an instructor in the materials science technology program for Edmonds Community College. There she is developed the coursework and laboratory experiments necessary to make the new program a success. She has 6 years of industry experience implementing lean manufacturing techniques, managing development projects, and leading cross-functional teams to assess technical capability of suppliers and strategic partnerships. She also has several years experience in the composites and ceramics manufacturing arenas. Ms. Larson holds a Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Washington and a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Bradley University.

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biography

Eric Davishahl Everett Community College

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Eric Davishahl holds an MS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Washington with a specialization in energy and fluid mechanics. Prior to joining the faculty at Everett Community College in 2001, Eric worked for Nu Element Inc, a fuel cell technology research and development company and at Energy International Inc. an energy industry consulting company in Bellevue, WA. He was selected as the George Shuh outstanding faculty member at Everett Community College for the 02-03 academic year.

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Jill Davishahl Edmonds Community College

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

The Do’s and Don’ts of Student Project Collaboration Between Colleges: A Hindsight View from Two Community Colleges Abstract

The human powered submarine project began for both schools in October of 2004, with the race deadline of June 26, 2005. Seven Everett Community College students and four Edmonds Community College students decided to take part in the challenge of building a human powered submarine. Together, both groups of students needed to obtain SCUBA training, create and install the safety systems, integrate all of the components, test, and repair the submarine. The team completed a functioning wet submarine in 9 months and competed in the International Submarine Races (ISR). This paper outlines the teaming successes and pitfalls of the project.

The International Submarine Races (ISR) involves human powered submarines that are designed and built by various students, including large universities, community colleges, private companies, and individuals. It provides an opportunity for students to take what they have learned in the classroom and apply it to a real-world situation such as the design and manufacture of a product as well as how to work in a team.

As the two schools began to collaborate, many unexpected triumphs and frustrations began to come to the surface. Items such as communication, timelines and competing schedules, workload, and distance proved to be the most challenging items, while the ISR competition, organization, teamwork, hands-on learning, and overall experience gave the team reasons to celebrate the project.

The joint effort between Edmonds and Everett Community Colleges provided both schools with valuable lessons about how to collaborate. Open communication is the most important aspect in any teaming situation and it is important for both sides to commit to ensuring it exists.

Introduction

The submarine project undertaken by Edmonds and Everett Community Colleges was full of unanticipated challenges and victories. The project originated from an Everett Community College student’s interest in participating in the International Submarine Races (ISR) held every odd year in Bethesda, MD, at the Carderock Naval Warfare Center’s David Taylor Model Basin. This basin is approximately 3200 feet long and 22 feet deep. The 2005 competition was the ISR’s 8th. The competition involves human powered submarines that are designed and built by various students, including large universities, community colleges, private companies, and individuals. It provides an opportunity for students to take what they have learned in the classroom and apply it to a real-world situation1.

When the interested Everett Community College student approached his pre-engineering advisor about the competition, the advisor suggested involving the Edmonds Community College Materials Science Technology students to build the composite hull since the Edmonds program is focused in that area. This arrangement hoped to balance out the specialties from each school:

Larson, N., & Davishahl, E., & Davishahl, J. (2006, June), The Do’s And Don’ts Of Student Project Collaboration Between Colleges: A Hindsight View From Two Community Colleges Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. https://peer.asee.org/549

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2006 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015