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The Engineering Decision Making Model: Its Importance As Applied Through The Context Of A World War Ii Simulation

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Conference

2005 Annual Conference

Location

Portland, Oregon

Publication Date

June 12, 2005

Start Date

June 12, 2005

End Date

June 15, 2005

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

K-12 Poster Session

Page Count

14

Page Numbers

10.1283.1 - 10.1283.14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/15617

Download Count

23

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Paper Authors

author page

Elias Faraclas

author page

Catherine Koehler

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

The Engineering Decision Making Model: Its Importance as Applied through the Context of a World War II Simulation

Elias W. Faraclas1 & Catherine Koehler2 1 School of Engineering, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering 2 Neag School of Education, Department of Curriculum & Instruction University of Connecticut Storrs, CT 06268

Abstract

The NSF sponsored Galileo Project, at the University of Connecticut, aims to bring engineering education and experiences to high school level classrooms and curriculum. In attempting to provide a comprehensive engineering experience, it was vital to define what is meant by engineering experience. While decision-making is not unique to engineering problems, it is a fundamental component of the engineering experience. Judgments based on qualitative and quantitative analysis forms the basis for the “engineering”-type decision making processes. As such, it is important to provide a meaningful context for decision-making involving both qualitative and quantitative skills. The decision-making process is explicitly defined as: (1) formulation of the problem, (2) statement of the objectives, (3) problem solving, (4) action assessment, (5) judgment and action, (6) validation analysis, (7) communication of results. Engineering education, especially at the high school level, should focus on a curriculum that lends to practicing the decision-making heurist in the context of any of these attributes. Axis & Allies by Milton Bradley is used as an example to apply the decision-making heurist.

Introduction

The National Science Foundation funded grant titled, de Vinci Ambassadors in the Classroom, the Galileo Project (NSF Project #DGE-0139307), at the University of Connecticut, aims to bring engineering education and experiences to high school level classrooms and curriculum. Central to this goal, several curriculum units, termed modules, have been developed and deployed to participating high schools throughout the state of Connecticut. These modules attempt to integrate some examples of engineering-type applications into existing mathematics, science and technology curriculum. While these modules have been successful in providing examples of engineering applications, they simultaneously fail to provide students with engineering experiences. This document and project has been created in an attempt to address this deficiency.

“Proceedings of the 2005 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2005, American Society for Engineering Education”

Faraclas, E., & Koehler, C. (2005, June), The Engineering Decision Making Model: Its Importance As Applied Through The Context Of A World War Ii Simulation Paper presented at 2005 Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon. https://peer.asee.org/15617

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