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The Engineering Education Scholars Program, Preparing A New Generation Of Faculty

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Conference

1998 Annual Conference

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 28, 1998

Start Date

June 28, 1998

End Date

July 1, 1998

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

16

Page Numbers

3.559.1 - 3.559.16

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/7090

Download Count

47

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Paper Authors

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Melody Ivory

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Kathleen Luker

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Kathleen Coppock

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Erol Tutumluer

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David Hill

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Christine Masters

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Amelia Regan

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Alkim Akyurtlu

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Eric Matsumoto

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Sandra Shaw Courter

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Sarah Pfatteicher

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 0575

The Engineering Education Scholars Program— Preparing a New Generation of Faculty

Eric Matsumoto, Christine Masters University of Texas at Austin/Pennsylvania State University Alkim Akyurtlu, David Hill, Melody Ivory Pennsylvania State University/University of California at Berkeley Amelia Regan, Erol Tutumluer University of California at Irvine/University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Kathleen Coppock, Sandra Courter, Kathleen Luker, Sarah Pfatteicher University of Wisconsin at Madison

Abstract

The Engineering Education Scholars Program (EESP) is a small but crucial endeavor in the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) approach to stimulate a comprehensive reform of undergraduate engineering education. For two summers, EESP has invited diverse groups of several dozen, doctoral engineering students and junior faculty members to participate in a weeklong, hands-on workshop focused on teaching philosophy, classroom skills, and the essentials of the academic career. This paper outlines the background and scope of EESP, the benefits enjoyed by participants, and tips on establishing EESP at other institutions.

Participants testify to enjoying myriad benefits during and after EESP, especially in effective teaching and learning strategies, small group/cooperative learning, and professional development. Seven cases are presented to illustrate how participants have made substantial progress in their understanding of important areas of pedagogy. These cases also demonstrate how this learning has translated into confidence in implementing fresh—and often successful— approaches in the classroom. Participants additionally credit EESP with an early opportunity to “learn the ropes” of the academic career, including valuable insight into the hiring process, mentoring, promotion and tenure, and writing grant proposals. The positive impact of EESP has motivated NSF and others to spread EESP around the country to benefit larger numbers of future faculty members. Lessons learned over the past two years through an extensive evaluation process are shared to help other institutions implement EESP and similarly equip new faculty to become the necessary “change agents” in undergraduate engineering education.

Background and Scope of EESP

The Engineering Education Scholars Program (EESP) is a small but crucial endeavor in the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) approach to stimulate a comprehensive reform of undergraduate engineering education1, 2. In 1996, organizers initiated EESP at the University of Wisconsin at Madison to encourage a cultural change in engineering education from traditional faculty-centered, individual teaching to student-centered, problem-based, team learning. To

Ivory, M., & Luker, K., & Coppock, K., & Tutumluer, E., & Hill, D., & Masters, C., & Regan, A., & Akyurtlu, A., & Matsumoto, E., & Courter, S. S., & Pfatteicher, S. (1998, June), The Engineering Education Scholars Program, Preparing A New Generation Of Faculty Paper presented at 1998 Annual Conference, Seattle, Washington. https://peer.asee.org/7090

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 1998 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015