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The Engineers In Technical, Humanitarian Opportunities Of Service Learning (Ethos) Program At The University Of Dayton As An Integrated Service Learning Program Model

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Global Engineering in an Interconnected World

Tagged Division

International

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

11.1285.1 - 11.1285.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/1253

Download Count

44

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Paper Authors

biography

Charles Schreier University of Dayton

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Charles Schreier is a graduate student and graduate assistant for the ETHOS program. His areas of interest include sustainability, mechanical design, appropriate technology and service-learning.

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biography

Carl Eger University of Dayton

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Carl (Bill) Eger is a graduate student and assistant director for the ETHOS program at the University of Dayton. Additionally, he is the lead student for the Department of Energy sponsored Industrial Assessment Center at UD; conducting energy, waste and productivity assessments for various manufacturing facilities and industrial processes. His areas of interest include sustainability, energy systems, appropriate technology and service-learning.

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Margaret Pinnell University of Dayton

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Margaret Pinnell is the director for the ETHOS program and assistant professor for the Department of Mechanical Engineering at The University of Dayton. Her areas of interest include materials, materials characterization and service-learning.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

The Engineers in Technical, Humanitarian Opportunities of Service-learning (ETHOS) program at the University of Dayton as an integrated service-learning program model

Abstract

The Engineers in Technical, Humanitarian Opportunities of Service- learning (ETHOS) program at the University of Dayton (Dayton, Ohio), designed by an interdisciplinary undergraduate engineering student team under faculty facilitation, incorporates educational philosophies guided by various diverse backgrounds. These guiding principles include appropriate technologies, sustainable development, the Catholic Marianist tradition, E.F. Schumacher’s “Small is Beautiful”, engineering ethics, service- learning principles, promotion of engineering vocation and other values consistent with appropriate application of humanitarian efforts. The ETHOS program seeks to provide opportunities where students gain understanding of technology’s global linkage with values, culture, society, politics and economy.

The ETHOS program facilitates curriculum integrated service- learning programming, including international technical immersions, classroom projects, student organization activities, and independent/collaborative research. Such opportunities expose students to alternative, non- traditional technologies that are based on fundamental science and engineering principles; thus, allowing higher comprehension of curriculum material in a hands-on, practical and humanitarian manner. Further, these experiences support the facilitation of appropriate and sustainable technologies for the developing world, locally and globally.

This paper presents a detailed description of the ETHOS program’s educational pedagogy in relation to facilitation of student learning and provision of unique learning opportunities. Specifically, this paper presents the ETHOS program’s methodology and approach to integrated engineering service- learning and appropriate technology education.

Introduction and Background

Engineering service- learning programs have emerged from being small, select university entities into fully- integrated programs. The Engineering for Developing Communities and Engineers Without Borders (EWB) programs at the University of Colorado – Boulder1,2, Engineering Projects in Community Service (EPICS) program at Purdue University3 , and the Edgerton Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology4 are several examples. Such programs have paved new direction within each institution’s engineering education; integrating engineering classroom education with real- world local and global challenges.

Definition of service-learning is wide-spread, but each definition resonates a similar theme. Most definitions agree that “service- learning can be characterized as a form of pedagogy.”5 More specifically, the ideology of service- learning is such that through service-learning opportunities, students are directly involved in a project that meets academic requirements, while providing a needed community service. Service-learning opportunities range in magnitude. For instance, opportunities can be included in a single course, be a multi- year community service project, or be a fully curriculum- integrated program. Engineering specific, service- learning has

Schreier, C., & Eger, C., & Pinnell, M. (2006, June), The Engineers In Technical, Humanitarian Opportunities Of Service Learning (Ethos) Program At The University Of Dayton As An Integrated Service Learning Program Model Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. https://peer.asee.org/1253

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