Asee peer logo

The Evolution Of The Patent And Trademark Depository Library And The Role Of The Patent And Trademark Librarian In The Digital Age

Download Paper |

Conference

2003 Annual Conference

Location

Nashville, Tennessee

Publication Date

June 22, 2003

Start Date

June 22, 2003

End Date

June 25, 2003

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Value Added Collection Management

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

8.1137.1 - 8.1137.13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/12462

Download Count

83

Request a correction

Paper Authors

author page

Karen Grigg

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2541

The Evolution of the Patent and Trademark Depository Library and the Role of the Patent and Trademark Librarian in the Digital Age Karen S. Grigg North Carolina State University Libraries

Abstract

This paper discusses effective methods of delivering patent and trademark reference assistance that support the university and library’s mission of time- and location- independent service. The North Carolina State University Libraries is the sole Patent and Trademark Depository Library (PTDL) in the state of North Carolina and, as such, supports a diverse and geographically scattered clientele, including University faculty, staff and students, the extension community, and independent inventors. Each of these stakeholders has differing levels of expertise in patent searching, and different needs and expectations from the library. At the same time, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has produced a suite of web-based products that empower users as never before. Although these new tools are a step in the right direction, much work remains before the USPTO web site can be recommended as a stand-alone source for patrons. Librarians must add value by creating web sites and online tutorials for patent and trademark users, focusing on best practices for web page and tutorial design. Additionally, the patent and trademark subject specialist must effectively train reference staff to provide quality services to patent and trademark patrons. Librarians must bridge the gap between the users and the resources, and must serve as advocates for the user to the USPTO. Patent librarians must also work with faculty and students to integrate patent and trademark searching skills into the curriculum. Finally, as the role of the Patent and Trademark Depository Library in the digital age is changing, PTDLs must continually assess their success in providing time and location independent services.

I. Introduction

The Patent and Trademark Depository Library Program (PTDLP) was launched in 1871 and provided for the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) to print and distribute patents to participating libraries. According to USPTO, “Since 1977 the PTDL network has grown to four times its original size. Currently, about half of the membership is academic libraries with nearly as many public libraries.” 1 The Patent and Trademark Depository Library Program benefits the general public by allowing libraries to house collections of patents and for librarians to assist the public in accessing these patents. Although this paper focuses primarily on many of the issues, challenges, and opportunities experienced by academic patent and trademark depository libraries, many of the recommendations can be applied to public libraries participating in the program.

The North Carolina State University Libraries (NCSU Libraries) joined the Patent and

Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright ©2003, American Society for Engineering Education 1

Grigg, K. (2003, June), The Evolution Of The Patent And Trademark Depository Library And The Role Of The Patent And Trademark Librarian In The Digital Age Paper presented at 2003 Annual Conference, Nashville, Tennessee. https://peer.asee.org/12462

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2003 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015