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The Impact Of Advanced Multimedia Technology On The Classroom 2000

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Conference

2001 Annual Conference

Location

Albuquerque, New Mexico

Publication Date

June 24, 2001

Start Date

June 24, 2001

End Date

June 27, 2001

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

5

Page Numbers

6.1013.1 - 6.1013.5

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/9342

Download Count

28

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Paper Authors

author page

Keith V. Johnson

author page

Mark Rajai

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2320

The Impact of Advanced Multimedia Technology on the Classroom 2000

Mark R. Rajai, Keith V. Johnson East Tennessee State University

Abstract

This paper studies the latest research on the impact of advanced multimedia technology on the classroom 2000. This paper focuses on one such advanced technology entitled “IPTeam Suite,” by Nexprise, Inc, which is starting to become widely used by the industry, but is relatively new to the academia. The application of the IPTeams software in data exchange, information sharing, messaging, and scheduling and documentation and its integration into classroom 2000 are discussed. A joint design course between two universities and an industrial partner, utilizing IPTeam software is also presented. Some of the other new cutting edge educational delivery mode and software such as Asynchronous Learning Networks and ZenPad used in pilot programs in leading universities are also studied.

I. Introduction

Due to highly competitive working environment, modern businesses have adopted cutting edge technologies as a way to compete in global market place. Because of the perceived benefits of these technologies in transmission of information and the extensive use of them by the modern business world, colleges and universities have begun integrating these technologies into the classroom 2000 environment.1,2,3

In this paper we study the impact of new multimedia technology on the classroom 2000. This paper is organized as follows. In the next section, we present what is a classroom 2000 and how it functions. Next, we discuss some cutting edge new educational delivery mode and software such as Asynchronous Learning Networks and ZenPad used in pilot programs in leading universities in the United States. We then examine one such advanced technology entitled “IPTeams Suite,” by Nexprise, Inc, which is starting to become widely used by the industry4. This software has been used by industry for team collaboration in an asynchronous mode over the Internet. The software has enabled companies to out-source their work to suppliers and subcontractors and compete more effectively in the global economy. However, this software is relatively new to the academia. We then present a pilot joint course between East Tennessee State University (ETSU), Loyola Marymount University (LMU) in Los Angeles, CA, and their industrial consultant. The IPTeams Suite was used in a new product development course where the students from the two universities have interacted in teams of joint projects. We conclude with some discussions from our own experience with IPTeams Suite software and the pilot project.

II. Classroom 2000

The classroom 2000 is a learning environment that would embrace new technologies and allow

“Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering education Annual Conferences & Exposition Copyright 2001, American Society for Engineering Education”

Johnson, K. V., & Rajai, M. (2001, June), The Impact Of Advanced Multimedia Technology On The Classroom 2000 Paper presented at 2001 Annual Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico. https://peer.asee.org/9342

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