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The Impact of Course Transformation on Student Learning and Success in Fundamental Electrical Engineering/Computer Science Courses

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

Assessment of Learning in ECE Courses

Tagged Division

Electrical and Computer

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

17

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/33394

Download Count

3

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Paper Authors

biography

David O. Johnson University of Kansas

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David O. Johnson is a Lecturer in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, KS, USA. He received his BSEE and MSEE from Kansas State University and his PhD in Computer Science from the University of Kansas. Prior to two post-doctoral research appointments at the Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands and in the Applied Linguistics Speech Laboratory at Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, USA, he was an Adjunct Professor in the Computer Science Electrical Engineering department at the University of Missouri – Kansas City. Before beginning his academic career, he spent 31 years in industry as a manager and software developer and consultant.

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Molly A. McVey University of Kansas

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Dr. Molly A. McVey is a post-doctoral teaching fellow at the University of Kansas School of Engineering where she works with faculty to incorporate evidence-based and student-centered teaching methods, and to research the impacts of changes made to teaching on student learning and success. Dr. McVey earned her Ph.D in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Kansas.

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Christopher Patrick Melgares University of Kansas

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Graduate student at the University of Kansas

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Abstract

Studies repeatedly show improvements in learning, achievement, and success for students after implementation of active-learning and student centered teaching practices. Active learning improves retention of content, achievement level, and success in courses (Felder, Woods et al. 2000, Freeman, Eddy et al. 2014). This paper describes the impacts on student learning and downstream success after a course transformation in a freshman level Electrical Engineering/Computer Science course, Introduction to Digital Logic Design. Introduction to Digital Design is a fairly standard course included in most Electrical Engineering and Computer Science curricula. It is an introductory course in digital logic circuits covering number representation, digital codes, Boolean algebra, combinatorial logic design, sequential logic design, and programmable logic devices. A previous study found evidence of improved learning in a fully-flipped version of the course compared to an “active learning” version of the course. This paper seeks to broaden the scope of this work by investigating multiple semesters worth of student performance data and by examining downstream student success and particularly the success of women, under-represented minorities, and first-generation college students. The research questions are: : 1) Does student performance on learning objectives improve in the fully flipped version of the course compared to the active learning version? 2) Is student success in the course improved in the active and/or flipped versions of the course compared to traditional lecture? 3) Is student success differentially impacted for under-represented groups? 4) What are student perceptions of the fully flipped course model? To address the first question, performance on exam questions mapped to the same learning objective will be compared between the active learning semester (Fall 2017) and two semesters of the fully-flipped course (Spring 2018 and Fall 2018). Additionally, DFW rates in the active and fully-flipped courses will be compared to DFW rates from the previous eight semesters of the course taught in a traditional lecture format. Finally, student surveys will be analyzed to determine student perceptions of the fully-flipped course.

Johnson, D. O., & McVey, M. A., & Melgares, C. P. (2019, June), The Impact of Course Transformation on Student Learning and Success in Fundamental Electrical Engineering/Computer Science Courses Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. https://peer.asee.org/33394

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