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The Impact of Educators’ Training in Photovoltaic Solar Energy in Developing Countries

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

ECCD International Outreach

Tagged Division

Energy Conversion and Conservation

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

17

Page Numbers

26.1541.1 - 26.1541.17

DOI

10.18260/p.24878

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/24878

Download Count

70

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Paper Authors

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Rim Razzouk Arizona State University

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Rim Razzouk is a Senior Instructional Designer at Arizona State University’s Ira Fulton School of Engineering. In her current position, Rim leads the curriculum development and the assessment and evaluation processes for the VOCTEC (Vocational Training and Education for Clean Energy) project. She coordinates the production of instructional materials with subject matter experts. Rim is also responsible for the data analyses and the write up of research reports for the purpose of continuous curriculum improvement. Rim has a PhD in Instructional Systems/Educational Technology from the Florida State University (FSU). Rim also holds a M.Sc degree in Instructional Systems and a Certificate in Human Performance Technology from FSU, and a B.Sc in Information Technology from Notre Dame University. Rim’s major project and research interests include technology integration in education; assessment and evaluation; learner-centered methods and strategies; and any other methods that assist in enhancing human performance and learning improvement. Rim has authored and co-authored several published articles in peer-reviewed journals, and conferences proceedings.

Anshuman Razdan is Professor in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering in the School of Computing, Informatics and Decision Systems Engineering (CIDSE). Dr. Razdan has a BS and MS in Mechanical Engineering and PhD in Computer Science. He has been a pioneer in computing based interdisciplinary collaboration and research at ASU. He leads the Image and 3D Exploitation and Analysis (I3DEA) lab (http://i3dea.asu.edu) He is the Principal Investigator and a collaborator on several federal grants from agencies including NSF, NGA and NIH and DHS, US Army, USAID, and Science Foundation of Arizona. He has led or participated in over $25Million grants in his career. Anshuman has published extensively in refereed journals and conferences and is sought as an invited speaker for many technical and non-technical forums. He has mentored over 30 Masters, PhDs and Post Docs. Anshuman works with industry and global organizations and has extensive experience negotiating contracts and executing projects globally such as Pacific Islands, Africa, Asia and the Caribbean.

Ambika P. Adhikari is Program Manager (Research) at the Office of Knowledge Enterprise and Development at Arizona State University (ASU). At ASU, he is also a Research Professor (affiliate faculty) at the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, and Sr. Sustainability Scientist at the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability. Ambika was Sr. Planner and Impact Fees Administrator at SRPMIC, Scottsdale, Arizona, and a Village Planner and Project Manager at City of Phoenix. He was the Nepal Country Representative of the Switzerland based IUCN – International Union for Conservation of Nature. Earlier, he was a Senior Director at DPRA Inc. in Toronto and Washington DC.
In Nepal, Ambika was an Associate Professor of Architecture and Planning at Tribhuvan University. He was a member of the Government of Nepal's National Water and Energy Commission – the highest policy making body in this sector. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Nepalese Engineers (ASNE).

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Anshuman Razdan Arizona State University, Polytechnic campus

biography

Ambika Prasad Adhikari Arizona State University

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Ambika P. Adhikari is Program Manager (Research) at the Office of Knowledge Enterprise and Development at Arizona State University (ASU). At ASU, he is also a Research Professor (affiliate faculty) at the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, and Sr. Sustainability Scientist at the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability.

Ambika was Sr. Planner and Impact Fees Administrator at SRPMIC, Scottsdale, Arizona, and a Village Planner and Project Manager at City of Phoenix. He was the Nepal Country Representative of the Switzerland based IUCN – International Union for Conservation of Nature. Earlier, he was a Senior Director at DPRA Inc. in Toronto and Washington DC.

In Nepal, Ambika was an Associate Professor of Architecture and Planning at Tribhuvan University. He was a member of the Government of Nepal's National Water and Energy Commission – the highest policy making body in this sector.

He is a Fellow of the American Society of Nepalese Engineers (ASNE).

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Abstract

The Impact of Educators’ Training in Photovoltaic Solar Energy in Developing Countries The Vocational Training and Education for Clean Energy (VOCTEC) program, atArizona State University (ASU), delivers training workshops to support the global objectives ofsustainability and security of energy supply in developing countries through educating, training,and preparing the people to use their energy resources to enhance their quality of lives. In 2011,VOCTEC received an award from the United States Agency for International Development(USAID) for creating and delivering a long-term vocational education and training in solarphotovoltaics (PV) energy systems in the Pacific islands and Africa. Through this paper we report the effectiveness of three train-the-trainer (educators)vocational PV trainings that were delivered by the VOCTEC program in Fiji (2013 and 2014), andKenya in 2014. The expectation by the end of each training is that the educators (trainees) wouldshow an increase in learning outcomes (knowledge and skills acquisition), and demonstrate anenhanced ability to conduct future technician/workforce trainings on solar PV in their respectivecountries and communities. A total of forty seven participants (including ten females) in Fiji and Kenya, selectedfrom different institutions, attended the training workshops. They engaged in a 10 to 14 day longprogram that comprised an array of training modules on basic and advanced technical topics(e.g., installation of solar PV system), hands-on exercises, non-technical (e.g., gender inclusion),and educational games to reinforce specific concepts taught in the training. The process ofcurriculum development was based on specific set of learning objectives, which motivated thedevelopment of the assessments. A framework based on Kirkpatrick’s evaluation model was used for the assessment andevaluation of the training intervention. This framework consists of four different focus areas: 1)reaction assessment: measures the participants’ perception of and satisfaction with the design ofthe training program and delivery of the content; 2) learning assessments: measures the extent towhich the participants acquired new knowledge and skills from the training; 3) behaviorevaluation: measures the participants’ ability to apply the newly learned knowledge and skills;and 4) impact: measures the long-term effect of the training intervention on the educators’knowledge and skill acquisition within 6 months of the initial training. The data used to assessthe first three areas was collected via ten different assessment instruments administered atvarious times during each workshop. Results from the data analysis indicate a high degree of participant satisfaction with thetraining workshops. In terms of learning, results show significant increase from pre- to post-assessments in all content areas. The performance measures for the hands-on exercises, andparticipants’ impression of their learning, triangulate the data and support this finding. Regardingthe behavior measure, the participants’ perception about their preparedness and confidence intheir abilities to train technicians were high (M = 2.80 on a 3-point scale, 3 being very confident).As of now, the long-term impact measures were collected for only the first training (Fiji,2013),and results show that educators’ knowledge and skill acquisition were maintained (M = 85%)even after 6 months of their training. The data for the long-term impact of the other two trainingsare being collected/analyzed. Despite certain challenges, which will be discussed in the paper, the trainings wereeffective as evident from the results. Feedback and insights gained from the trainees will allowus to continuously improve future trainings and the VOCTEC program.

Razzouk, R., & Razdan, A., & Adhikari, A. P. (2015, June), The Impact of Educators’ Training in Photovoltaic Solar Energy in Developing Countries Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.24878

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