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The Medical Device Sandbox: A Creative Learning Experience for BME Students and Medical Learners

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Conference

2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

New Orleans, Louisiana

Publication Date

June 26, 2016

Start Date

June 26, 2016

End Date

August 28, 2016

ISBN

978-0-692-68565-5

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Hands-on Learning in BME

Tagged Division

Biomedical

Page Count

9

DOI

10.18260/p.26988

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/26988

Download Count

140

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Paper Authors

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Rachael Schmedlen University of Michigan

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Rachael Schmedlen is a Lecturer IV in the Biomedical Engineering Department at the University of Michigan. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. in Bioengineering from Rice University. Over the past ten years, Dr. Schmedlen has played a critical role in evolving the U-M biomedical engineering undergraduate curriculum, particularly the BME Design Program. Passionate about expanding engaged, active-learning experiences and clinical immersion opportunities for students that improve their ability to execute the design process, Dr. Schmedlen has developed an undergraduate capstone design course, biomedical engineering laboratory, and clinical observation and needs finding course. In addition to teaching an introduction to biomedical engineering course for first-year students, she is also serves as an advisor for undeclared engineering undergraduates.

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Stephanie Marie Kusano University of Michigan

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Stephanie Kusano is an assessment and evaluation postdoctoral research associate at the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching at University of Michigan. She has a Ph.D. in Engineering Education, M.S. in Biomedical Engineering, and B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, all from Virginia Tech. Her research interests include engaged learning and high impact practices, assessment, and design education. Her teaching experience has primarily been with first-year engineering.

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John Gosbee University of Michigan

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Physician with human factors engineering background who works with academia, industry, and regulatory bodies to design safer medical devices and systems. Previously with NASA contractors, Michigan State University, and Dept. of Veterans Affairs Patient Safety Center. Now both industry consultant and teacher at University of Michigan Medical School and Department of Biomedical Engineering. Published widely in medical and engineering press, and invited speaker internationally. Received medical device achievement award in 2003 from Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI).

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Jennifer Chen Lee University of Michigan

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Jennifer Lee is a third-year student pursuing biomedical engineering student at the University of Michigan. She is currently a research assistant at the Laboratory of Innovation in Global Health Technology. Her research interests include areas of global health technologies and engineering design. She is also currently a facilitator for the Medical Device Sandbox at University of Michigan and a member of Tau Beta Pi.

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Jan P Stegemann University of Michigan

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Jan Stegemann is a Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. He received BS and MS degrees in Chemical Engineering from the University of Toronto. Prior to earning his PhD in Biomedical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Dr. Stegemann worked for five years at Boston-based W.R. Grace & Co. (later called Circe Biomedical), where his research focused on cell-based bioartificial organs. Dr. Stegemann’s current research focuses on the use of extracellular environments to control cell function and the development of engineered tissues. He is also an active educator in the BME Design Program at the University of Michigan, with a focus on graduate-level medical product design and development.

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Abstract

We have developed a Medical Device Sandbox (MDS) to promote interprofessional collaboration and learning between biomedical engineering (BME) students and medical learners that is critical to the design, development, use, and commercialization of safe and effective medical equipment. Currently, interprofessional learning opportunities among medical trainees and BME students are informal and ad hoc. Medical students and residents occasionally seek engineering expertise about device safety and design. BME students occasionally use simulation facilities at the medical school with little guidance or continuity. All these learners seek a better blend of realism and clinical expertise. The Medical Device Sandbox provides a structured environment and mechanism to bring these groups of learners together, to help them understand “what is” and “what could be” in regards to medical devices in hospital, clinic, and homecare settings. It consists of a simulated clinical space equipped with medical devices and accessories used in these settings. During scheduled sessions facilitated through expert instruction, interprofessional teams of BMEs (undergraduates and/or graduates in design courses) and medical learners are presented with a realistic patient safety scenario involving the use of a medical device, asked to re-enact treatment, identify problems, and brainstorm solutions using the equipment and supplies available within the space.

The key learning objectives assessed from these MDS sessions offered during the 2015-2016 Academic Year include: The MDS 1.) enhances engineering students’ and medical learners’ creative process and ability to innovate solutions to medical device design; BME students and medical learners will 2.) report an enhanced understanding of the clinical perspective and more positive attitudes toward interprofessional teams 3.) effectively design low-fidelity prototype devices that address use errors and fit into current hospital/clinic settings, and 4.) better identify possible use errors and design flaws that can be corrected to improve device safety and functionality. An existing creative thinking rubric [1] will be adapted to identify the degree to which students/learners employ the creative process during the MDS sessions. Separate retrospective surveys will ask BME students and medical learners to self-assess their understanding of the clinical perspective, the roles of one another in the development of medical devices, their attitudes towards interprofessional teamwork, and the degree to which the sandbox helped to improve identification of function and use errors. Finally, a rubric will evaluate the effectiveness of the teams’ designs to address use errors and adapt to hospital/clinic/home settings.

1. Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU), not dated. Creative Thinking VALUE rubric. Available: https://www.aacu.org/value/rubrics/teamwork

Schmedlen, R., & Kusano, S. M., & Gosbee, J., & Lee, J. C., & Stegemann, J. P. (2016, June), The Medical Device Sandbox: A Creative Learning Experience for BME Students and Medical Learners Paper presented at 2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, New Orleans, Louisiana. 10.18260/p.26988

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2016 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015