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The Nsf Foundation Coalition: Curriculum Change And Underrepresented Groups

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Conference

1997 Annual Conference

Location

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Publication Date

June 15, 1997

Start Date

June 15, 1997

End Date

June 18, 1997

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

7

Page Numbers

2.421.1 - 2.421.7

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/6715

Download Count

55

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Paper Authors

author page

Karen Frair

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Karan L. Watson

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2670

The NSF Foundation Coalition: Curriculum Change and Underrepresented Groups

Dr. Karen Frair, Dr. Karan Watson University of Alabama/Texas A&M University

Abstract The Foundation Coalition was funded in 1993 as the fifth coalition in the National Science Foundation's Engineering Education Coalitions Program. The member institutions are developing improved curricula and learning environment models that are based on four primary thrusts: integration of subject matter within the curriculum, cooperative and active learning, technology- enabled learning, and continuous improvement through assessment and evaluation. The Foundation Coalition partners draw on their diverse strengths and mutual support to construct improved curricula and learning environments; to attract and retain a more demographically diverse student body; and to graduate a new generation of engineers who can more effectively solve increasingly complex, rapidly changing societal problems. The improvement of recruitment and graduation of traditionally underrepresented groups is an integral part of the Foundation Coalition strategic plan. This paper discusses Coalition projects to date and other efforts focused on increasing the participation of underrepresented groups in engineering education.

Introduction The National Science Foundation's Engineering Education Coalitions program was established to “stimulate bold, innovative, and comprehensive models for systemic reform of undergraduate engineering education. The purpose of the program is to join universities and colleges of differing characters in collaboration to experiment and implement, acting as change agents for the engineering education community at large.” In 1993, the NSF Foundation Coalition (FC) was funded as the fifth coalition in the EEC program. The member institutions - Arizona State University, Maricopa Community College District, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Texas A&M University, Texas A&M University - Kingsville, Texas Woman's University, and the University of Alabama - draw on their diverse strengths and mutual support to construct improved curricula and learning environments; to attract and retain a more demographically diverse student body; and to graduate a new generation of engineers who can more effectively function in the 21st century.

Foundation Coalition Vision The vision of the NSF Foundation Coalition is an engineering education partnership between students, faculty, and industry that will produce graduates who have an • Increased appreciation and motivation for life-long learning, • Increased ability to participate in effective teams, • Effective oral, written, graphical, and visual communication skills,

Frair, K., & Watson, K. L. (1997, June), The Nsf Foundation Coalition: Curriculum Change And Underrepresented Groups Paper presented at 1997 Annual Conference, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. https://peer.asee.org/6715

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