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The Pitt STRIVE Program: Adopting Evidence-Based Principles "The Meyerhoff and PROMISE Way”

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Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

Minorities in Engineering Division Technical Session 5

Tagged Division

Minorities in Engineering

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

19

DOI

10.18260/1-2--35355

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/35355

Download Count

40

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Paper Authors

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Deanna Christine Easley Sinex University of Pittsburgh Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-7159-3689

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Deanna C.E.Sinex is a Bioengineering Ph.D. candidate at the University of Pittsburgh. She earned her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Her research involves the development and application of engineering concepts and active learning techniques in clinical and institutional learning environments to help improve the literacy of fundamental, yet critical aspects of health.

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Mary E. Besterfield-Sacre University of Pittsburgh

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Dr. Mary Besterfield-Sacre is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Nickolas A. DeCecco Professor in Industrial Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. She is the Founding Director for the Engineering Education Research Center (EERC) in the Swanson School of Engineering, and serves as a Center Associate for the Learning Research and Development Center. Her principal research is in engineering education assessment, which has been funded by the NSF, Department of Ed, Sloan, EIF, and NCIIA. Dr. Sacre’s current research focuses on three distinct but highly correlated areas – innovative design and entrepreneurship, engineering modeling, and global competency in engineering.

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Wendy Carter-Veale University of Maryland, Baltimore County

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Dr. Wendy Carter-Veale previously served as the Interim Director of AGEP PROMISE Academy Alliance(APAA). Currently, she is the Internal Evaluator for APAA, Social Science Research Coordinator, and the Dissertation Coach for the Graduate School at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and has worked with faculty, graduate students, and administrators at UMCP and UMB. She has been involved with graduate student retention, institutional survey administration, and with AGEP projects as a Dissertation Coach for PROMISE: Maryland’s AGEP, the University of Michigan AGEP, and the University of Pittsburgh’s Pitt STRIVE AGEP. She is a quantitative social science researcher and lead author for the “Dissertation House Model” (2016), published by CBE Life Sciences, which was acknowledged at the 2018 AGEP National Research Conference, “Pathways to a Diverse Professoriate,” at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Carter-Veale co-authored “Structured Interventions for Underrepresented Students and Faculty Members in STEM” (2014), as part of the 2012 Conference Summary for “Understanding interventions that broaden participation in research careers: Intervening to Critical Mass,” and she co-authored the book chapter, “Successful Ph.D. Pathways to Advanced STEM Careers for Black Women” (2011). Carter-Veale is Co-PI on the Career Pathways project (Council of Graduate Schools), and she has had social and behavioral sciences faculty experience at Arizona State University – West, and the University of Maryland University College. As an entrepreneur she has formed successful businesses, TA-DA Thesis and Dissertation Accomplished, Ph.D. Completion and conducted many professional development workshops for graduate students at many universities across the country. Her expertise in graduate retention and Ph.D. completion is well known. Dr. Carter-Veale co-authored a recent book with Dr. Howard G. Adams entitled, Mastering the Ph.D. Process: Strategies for Surviving, Thriving, Excelling, and Succeeding as a Doctoral Student. She has conducted many professional development workshops for graduate students at several graduate schools including Duke University, MIT, Cornell University, University of Michigan, Western Michigan, and Arizona State University.

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Drew G. Yohe University of Pittsburgh

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Drew Yohe is an undergraduate researcher pursuing his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh.

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Steven Abramowitch University of Pittsburgh

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Dr. Abramowitch’s is an Associate Professor in the Department of Bioengineering in the Swanson School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. He is the director of the Translational Biomechanics Laboratory where his research applies approaches from mechanical testing, image analysis, mathematical and computational modeling, and device design to solve problems related to female pelvic health. He has secured funding from the NIH, DOD, NSF, and other sources to support these efforts. He is also co-director of 2 NSF sponsored programs focused on the success of underrepresented minorities and a national award winner (BMES 2019) for his work in diversity and inclusion.

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Sylvanus N. Wosu University of Pittsburgh

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Sylvanus Wosu is the Associate Dean for Diversity Affairs and Associate Professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at the University of Pittsburgh. Wosu's research interests are in the areas of impact physics and engineering of new composite materials, dynamic problems in composites failure, and energy containment and responses of dynamical systems. Wosu is also interested in engineering education with particular interests in development models for effective recruitment, retention, and mentoring of women and under-represented students. Other research interests include experimental investigation of the dynamic failures and crack propagation of cylindrical composite storage tank with particular interests in the development of hydrogen storage tanks, failure behaviors of hydrogen-diffused porous composite materials, and the containment of the associated hydrogen embrittlement. Wosu established an integrative dynamic impact and high speed imaging system at the University of Pittsburgh Department of Mechanical Engineering that is capable of simulating low and high strain rate penetration loading and capturing the dynamic event at two million frames per second. Special sample fixtures he developed are used to study perforation impact and single and multi-mode fracture tests and general characterization of materials failure. His other research interests include experimental nuclear medical physics, laser-based medical physics research in cerebral metabolic pathways of oxygen, petro physics, and petroleum fluid characterization of reservoirs.

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Abstract

According to the Science and Engineering Indicators 2018 report, racial and ethnic minority groups, including Blacks, Hispanics, and American Indians or Alaska Natives, have low levels of participation in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) fields both compared with other groups and compared with their proportion in the population. Much of the research on underrepresented minorities in STEM draws from a deficit model, whereby researchers attribute the lack of diversity in STEM education or a STEM career, to a STEM education pipeline problem whereby leaks start in preschool and continue through the highest levels of education. Less research has focused on the extent of institutional change necessary to support academic success, the building of partnerships, or the possibility of replicating effective practices that have worked at other institutions. While a limited number of institutions have developed successful models, expanding the reach of these achievements continues to be a critical challenge for today’s colleges and universities. This study focuses on one such partnership and model of replication. Two programs that demonstrated success in increasing the number of underrepresented students pursuing and completing STEM doctoral programs are housed at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). The Meyerhoff program has demonstrated over 30 years of unmatched successful recruiting, retaining, and transitioning underrepresented undergraduate STEM scholars to graduate programs all over the country. The PROMISE Program, an NSF AGEP funded program which began in 2003, provides graduate programming with special emphasis on historically underrepresented persons to increase the number of Ph.D. graduates who pursue faculty positions. Many argue that the success of these programs cannot be replicated at other universities and that a unique set of circumstances are what makes these programs successful in their missions. To test this notion, in 2015 the University of Pittsburgh was awarded an NSF AGEP-KAT award to adapt and adopt strategies and practices of the aforementioned programs. While there are differences between UMBC and the University of Pittsburgh, we feel that the adoption of the principles of the programs provides a framework to replicate these successful results. The goal of this paper is to identify the evidence-based principles that contribute to the continued success of the Meyerhoff and PROMISE programs housed at UMBC and illustrate the alignment of these principles within our institution to create and adapt a baseline by which the success of the University of Pittsburgh’s AGEP program (the Pitt STRIVE Program) can be assessed.

Sinex, D. C. E., & Besterfield-Sacre, M. E., & Carter-Veale, W., & Yohe, D. G., & Abramowitch, S., & Wosu, S. N. (2020, June), The Pitt STRIVE Program: Adopting Evidence-Based Principles "The Meyerhoff and PROMISE Way” Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--35355

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