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The Role of Teaching Self-Efficacy in Electrical and Computer Engineering Faculty Teaching Satisfaction

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Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

Faculty Development Research

Tagged Division

Faculty Development Division

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

13

DOI

10.18260/1-2--35366

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/35366

Download Count

128

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Paper Authors

biography

Kent A. Crick Iowa State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-9864-5947

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Kent Crick is currently in his third year as a graduate student at Iowa State University. He is currently a PhD candidate in Counseling Psychology and conducts research in self-determination as it relates to student and faculty motivation and well-being. Prior to attending Iowa State, he obtained a Master's Degree in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis. He then worked as a research coordinator for the Diabetes and Translational Research Center at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, IN for three years.

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Elise A. Frickey Iowa State University

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Elise is a graduate student at Iowa State University. As a doctoral student in Counseling Psychology, she has been involved with research on the application of self-determination theory to different domains to allow for better understanding of the relationships between contextual factors, basic psychological needs, and indices of well-being. Prior to attending Iowa State University, she obtained a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Spanish from Hillsdale College.

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Lisa M. Larson Ph.D. Iowa State University of Science and Technology

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Dr. Larson is a professor in the department of psychology. She has examined Self Determination Theory as a framework to explain how the environment impacts well-being for faculty, students in general, and student veterans. Her other work includes the intersection of personality and vocational interest as well as how counselors learn to become effective in their work with clients.

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Mack Shelley Iowa State University of Science and Technology Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-0414-5843

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Mack Shelley holds the titled position of University Professor of Political Science, Statistics, and School of Education. He currently serves as Chair of the Department of Political Science. His research and teaching focuses on public policy. He has extensive experience with grants- and contracts-funded research and evaluation for federal and state agencies, and for nonprofit organizations.

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Abstract

The Role of Teaching Self-Efficacy in Electrical and Computer Engineering Faculty Teaching Satisfaction We request this abstract as a Research Paper. Electrical and computer engineering (ECpE) faculty are under increasing pressure to teach more undergraduate students, generate more funding, produce scholarship, and mentor more graduate students. Moreover, reduced budgets for universities result in an inability to replace faculty, minimal annual raises, and fewer teaching assistants, all of which affect faculty well-being at work. Well-being for faculty in general has been shown to relate to retention and faculty job performance. The present study focuses on one element of faculty well-being, namely faculty’s satisfaction with their teaching roles. Our first purpose was to examine if, in line with previous research, environmental supports (e.g., support of the university, department, colleagues, chair) contribute to ECSE faculty’s teaching satisfaction. The second purpose of the study was to anchor the study using self-determination theory (SDT; Ryan & Deci, 2000). SDT posits that satisfaction of three basic psychological needs would add additional predictive power beyond work environment supports to impact faculty well-being. The need measured in this paper was perceived competence specific to teaching (i.e., the need to perceive oneself as efficacious in teaching). Hierarchical regression models were estimated to answer the two research questions, namely (1) does environmental support significantly predict teaching satisfaction and (2) does teaching self-efficacy make a significant contribution to predicting teaching satisfaction beyond the predictive power of each environmental support variable? Four analyses were conducted with each environmental support variable entered in step one (university, department, colleague, chair) and with teaching self-efficacy added in step two of the regression analyses. In step one of all four analyses, the environmental supports separately each significantly predicted teaching satisfaction: (a) university support accounted for 26% of the variance in teaching satisfaction, (b) departmental support accounted for 59% of the variance in teaching satisfaction, (c) colleague support accounted for 23% of the variance in teaching satisfaction, and (d) chair support accounted for 28% of the variance in teaching satisfaction. In step two of all four analyses, adding teaching self-efficacy to this model significantly predicted additional variance in teaching satisfaction beyond each environmental support. After university support, it contributed an additional 21% of variance in teaching satisfaction. After departmental support, it contributed an additional 6% of the variance in teaching satisfaction. After colleague support, it contributed an additional 20% of variation in teaching satisfaction. After chair support, it accounted for an additional 9% of variation in teaching satisfaction. These results lead to the conclusion that these four environmental supports and teaching self-efficacy collectively made a large contribution (together explaining 43% to 65% of the variance) to the prediction of faculty teaching satisfaction. These effects are large enough for administrators to target these factors as they seek to increase ECpE faculty satisfaction with teaching, potentially leading to better teaching performance and retention. Consistent with SDT, these findings suggest that leadership would do well to prioritize efforts to support teaching self-efficacy within their departments as a means to enhance faculty well-being. We prefer a poster.

Crick, K. A., & Frickey, E. A., & Larson, L. M., & Shelley, M. (2020, June), The Role of Teaching Self-Efficacy in Electrical and Computer Engineering Faculty Teaching Satisfaction Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--35366

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