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The Use Of Industrial Design Projects As A Means For Integrating Senior Engineering Design And Engineering Economics

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Conference

1998 Annual Conference

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 28, 1998

Start Date

June 28, 1998

End Date

July 1, 1998

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

6

Page Numbers

3.582.1 - 3.582.6

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/7494

Download Count

18

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Paper Authors

author page

J. Darrell Gibson

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 1339

THE USE OF INDUSTRIAL DESIGN PROJECTS AS A MEANS FOR INTEGRATING SENIOR ENGINEERING DESIGN AND ENGINEERING ECONOMICS

J. Darrell Gibson Professor of Mechanical Engineering Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

ABSTRACT

Strategies for the development and maintenance of university/industrial relationships can take several forms. These include industrial boards of advisors, research contracts, internships, faculty sabbaticals, guest lectures from industry, etc. One strategy that is underutilized is the use of student design teams which complete projects suggested by industry. These types of projects provide opportunities for student/company as well as faculty/company interactions and additionally involve industrial professional staff with the educational process.

In recent years the author has developed student project activities with industry in senior design courses. These projects have been very successful in building positive relationships with numerous companies. For example, the capstone course, SYSTEMS DESIGN, requires that each student team start with a general design problem suggested by a company. The team then carries the project through the Problem Definition, Conceptual Design, Embodiment Design, and Detail Design phases. During the embodiment phase each team is required to evaluate their proposed design with respect to economic considerations. Depending on the proposed design solution and on the preferences of the particular company, the economic measures of benefit/cost ratios, return on investment, internal rate of return, or simple payback are used to evaluate and compare recommended design proposals.

The student experience of working with actual companies on real problems and being forced to justify their design proposal on an economic as well as a technical basis has been an excellent strategy for learning engineering economics. The methodology for selecting and administering these industrial projects will be presented.

Gibson, J. D. (1998, June), The Use Of Industrial Design Projects As A Means For Integrating Senior Engineering Design And Engineering Economics Paper presented at 1998 Annual Conference, Seattle, Washington. https://peer.asee.org/7494

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