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Thermal Science Course Development Using Industry Input

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Conference

2003 Annual Conference

Location

Nashville, Tennessee

Publication Date

June 22, 2003

Start Date

June 22, 2003

End Date

June 25, 2003

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

New Ideas in Energy Education

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

8.1194.1 - 8.1194.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/11812

Download Count

17

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Paper Authors

author page

Heather Cooper

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2533

Thermal Science Course Development Using Industry Input

Heather L. Cooper Purdue University

Abstract

This paper discusses the use of an industry survey as a tool for course development in thermal sciences. The thermal science portion of the Mechanical Engineering Technology curriculum at Purdue University includes two core courses, both of which have traditionally included topics in applied thermodynamics only. In recent years, a minimal amount of heat transfer content has been added to the introductory course to help offset the removal of a heat transfer elective from the program.

A survey was completed to assess the need for even more heat transfer coverage in the thermal science curriculum, by investigating how frequently various thermal science topics and applications are encountered in industry. This paper outlines the survey process and describes how the input from industry is being used to guide the development of new lecture and laboratory materials in both heat transfer and combined thermal systems topics. An initial assessment of the effectiveness of the new course materials is also presented.

Introduction Continuous evaluation and revision of courses is a standard part of engineering and engineering technology education. Specific to engineering technology curricula, the accreditation criteria include technical currency and continuous improvement as two of the requirements for accreditation1. Therefore, updates to the thermal science portion of the Mechanical Engineering Technology (MET) curriculum at Purdue University are normal and expected. The current program includes two core thermal science courses, an introductory course at the sophomore level and a second course at the junior level. Both courses have traditionally covered topics in applied thermodynamics only, but in recent years, heat transfer content has been added to the introductory course to offset the removal of a heat transfer elective from the curriculum.

Within the context of continuous improvement, it was desired to further increase the amount of heat transfer content in the program. Several MET faculty teaching thermal science courses at various Purdue locations expressed the perception that increased heat transfer background would help maintain the technical currency of the courses. The logical placement of the additional coverage would be within the introductory course, so that graduates of the associate’s degree program would have heat transfer knowledge to carry into their industrial experiences, regardless of whether they continued on for the bachelor’s degree. Since changes to the introductory course content could ultimately affect the later applied thermodynamics course, a survey was developed to assess the need for additional heat transfer material in the program. The primary goal of the survey was to ensure that course updates would reflect current needs in industry and minimize impact to the junior-level course. The following discussion presents the development and results of the survey, issues encountered in the survey process, and the effectiveness of the survey process in guiding the enhancement of course materials.

Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2003, American Society for Engineering Education

Cooper, H. (2003, June), Thermal Science Course Development Using Industry Input Paper presented at 2003 Annual Conference, Nashville, Tennessee. https://peer.asee.org/11812

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