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Three Practical And Effective Rf And Emc Experiments For A Computer Engineering Course On Electromagnetics And Emc

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Conference

2009 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Austin, Texas

Publication Date

June 14, 2009

Start Date

June 14, 2009

End Date

June 17, 2009

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Project-Based Learning in ECE Education

Tagged Division

Electrical and Computer

Page Count

24

Page Numbers

14.1269.1 - 14.1269.24

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/4706

Download Count

321

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Paper Authors

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Keith Hoover Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Keith Hoover received his B.S. degree from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in 1971 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees at the University of Illinois in 1972 and 1976, respectively, all in electrical engineering.

He is currently a full professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Terre Haute, IN. His teaching and research interests include electromagnetic compatibility, instrumentation, and embedded systems.

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biography

JianJian Song Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Jianjian Song (M’88) received his B.S. degree in radio engineering from Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Wuhan, China in 1982, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Minnesota in 1985 and 1991. Since 1999, he has been an associate professor with Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Terre Haute, Indiana. From 1991 to 1999, he worked for the Institute of High Performance Computing of the National University of Singapore as research scientist and division manager. His teaching and research interests include electromagnetic compatibility, high-speed digital system design, microcontroller-based system design, embedded and real-time systems, electronics design automation, and algorithms and architecture for parallel and cluster computing.

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Edward Wheeler Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Edward Wheeler (⁍9‵S⁍97) received his B.S. degree from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in 1982 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees at the University of Missouri-Rolla in 1993 and 1995, respectively, all in electrical engineering.

He is currently an Associate Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Terre Haute, IN. His teaching and research interests include electromagnetic compatibility, signal integrity, microelectromechanical systems, and the electrical and magnetic properties of materials.

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James Drewniak Missouri University of Science and Technology

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James L. Drewniak (S’85-M’90-SM’01-Fellow’07) received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1985, 1987, and 1991, respectively. He joined the Electrical Engineering Department at the University of Missouri-Rolla in 1991 where he is one of the principle faculty in the Electromagnetic Compatibility Laboratory. His research and teaching interests include electromagnetic compatibility in high speed digital and mixed signal designs, electronic packaging, and electromagnetic compatibility in power electronic based systems.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Three Practical and Effective RF and EMC Experiments for a Computer Engineering Course on Electromagnetics and EMC Keith Hoover1, Jianjian Song1, Edward Wheeler1, James Drewiniak2 1 Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology 2 Missouri University of Science and Technology

Abstract

This paper presents three practical and effective electronic hardware experiments which demonstrate respectively (1) use of a common-mode choke to perform common-mode current suppression, (2) construction and analysis of an FM wireless microphone and (3) study of bypass capacitor effectiveness to demonstrate concepts related to electromagnetic compatibility (EMC), signal integrity (SI) and radio frequency (RF) design. The experiments have been performed as part of the laboratory portion of our required junior-level course for computer engineering students on electromagnetics and EMC. These experiments have helped students understand the underlying physics in addition to demonstrating measurement techniques and solution options for the topics discussed in the course. They are easy and inexpensive to implement and perform because they can be set up on a standard breadboard. They should prove useful in any engineering course on RF circuits, electromagnetic, SI and EMC. As high speed, low power, wireless, and hand-held embedded engineering designs become more common, computer engineering students have a growing need for knowledge and experience in design and manufacturing issues related to SI and EMC. We have found these experiments to be valuable and effective in enhancing student interest in RF, SI and EMC.

1 Introduction

Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and signal integrity (SI) have become pervasive design issues in high-speed designs of digital systems, wireless devices, mixed signal systems, and hand-held devices. Two ready examples of industries with acute and long-standing need for engineers with an understanding of EMC design issues are automotive electronic systems and home entertainment systems.

Ensuring signal and power integrity in digital electronic systems is vital to maintaining signal viability as these signals propagate along their path amidst noise from different sources. The topic is critical in electronic system design at various levels including backplanes, printed circuit boards, integrated circuit packages and integrated circuits. Signal and power integrity are inherently multidisciplinary topics that draw upon knowledge and techniques from circuit design, electromagnetic field theory, material properties, and packaging design.

As signal speeds increase, lumped element models become inadequate to describe circuit behavior, and coupling and crosstalk between adjacent conductors become significant problems. The models used to describe electronic signals and devices must consider these electromagnetic effects at high speeds when the sizes of devices and signal paths are of the same order as wavelength of the signals. Circuit designers will need to understand that signals propagate as waves in order to successfully design high speed circuits and systems.

Hoover, K., & Song, J., & Wheeler, E., & Drewniak, J. (2009, June), Three Practical And Effective Rf And Emc Experiments For A Computer Engineering Course On Electromagnetics And Emc Paper presented at 2009 Annual Conference & Exposition, Austin, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/4706

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