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Transference of Hands-on Desktop Learning Pedagogy Across Institution and Program Types

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Conference

2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 23, 2018

Start Date

June 23, 2018

End Date

July 27, 2018

Conference Session

Hands-On Projects and Demos

Tagged Division

Chemical Engineering

Page Count

8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/31155

Download Count

14

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Paper Authors

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Negar Beheshti Pour Washington State University

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Negar Beheshtipour received her B.S. in chemical Engineering at Tehran University where she also taught as a teacher assistant. She is currently working towards a PhD in Chemical Engineering at Washington State University under supervision of Dr. Van Wie and Dr. Thiessen. In addition to her chemical engineering research into phase separation in microgravity, Negar is interested in engineering education and new pedagogies. Now she is working on low-cost version of desktop learning modules.

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Kitana Manivone Kaiphanliam Washington State University

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Kitana Kaiphanliam is a Senior Undergraduate student in the Chemical Engineering program at Washington State University (WSU), where she will also be continuing her education. She currently works with the Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE) group on a hands-on learning project funded by the National Science Foundation's Division of Undergraduate Education. Kitana is an active member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) at WSU, and will serve as their Graduate Student Advisor for the 2018 academic year.

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Arshan Nazempour Washington State University

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Arshan Nazempour completed his PhD in Chemical Engineering at Washington State University and worked under Professor Van Wie's supervision on two projects, synergistic influences of oscillating pressure and growth factor on chondrogenesis in a novel centrifugal bioreactor and hands-on learning solution for students.

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David B. Thiessen Washington State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-4283-5914

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David B.Thiessen received his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Colorado in
1992 and has been at Washington State University since 1994. His research interests include fluid
physics, acoustics, and engineering education.

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Robert F. Richards Washington State University

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Dr. Robert Richards received the Ph.D. in Engineering from the University of California, Irvine. He then worked in the Building and Fire Research Laboratory at NIST as a Post-Doctoral Researcher before joining the faculty of the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Washington State University. His research is in thermodynamics and heat and mass transfer. Over the last five years he has become involved in developing and disseminating research based learning methods. He was a participant in the NSF Virtual Communities of Practice (VCP) program in Spring, 2013, learning research based methods to instruct thermodynamics. More recently he introduced the concept of fabricating very low cost thermal fluid experiments using 3-D printing and vacuum forming at the National Academy of Engineering’s Frontiers of Engineering Education in October, 2013. He is presently a co PI on the NSF IUSE: Affordable Desktop Learning Modules to Facilitate Transformation in Undergrad¬uate Engineering Classes, High School Recruitment and Retention.

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Fanhe Shamus Meng Washington State University

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Mr. Fanhe Meng received his B.S in school of materials science and engineering in Nanjing University of Science and Technology. He is working towards a PhD degree in Mechanical Engineering in Washington State University. He has been involved in fabricating low cost fluid experiments combining computer-aided design, 3D printing and vacuum forming since 2014. He speaks both English and Chinese.

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Olusola Adesope Washington State University

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Dr. Olusola O. Adesope is an Associate Professor of Educational Psychology and a Boeing Distinguished Professor of STEM Education at Washington State University, Pullman. His research is at the intersection of educational psychology, learning sciences, and instructional design and technology. His recent research focuses on the cognitive and pedagogical underpinnings of learning with computer-based multimedia resources; knowledge representation through interactive concept maps; meta-analysis of empirical research, and investigation of instructional principles and assessments in STEM.

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Sarah A. Wilson University of Kentucky

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Derek L. Englert University of Kentucky

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Bernard J. Van Wie Washington State University

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Prof. Bernard J. Van Wie received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D., and did his postdoctoral in thermodynamics at Oklahoma University. While at OU he also taught as a graduate student as well as a visiting lecturer. He has been on the Washington State University faculty for 34 years and for the past 20 years has focused on innovative pedagogy for which he won two university-wide teaching innovation awards. His technical research is in biotechnology.

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Abstract

Studies are underway on transference of new low-cost desktop learning module (LC-DLM) technology and accompanying pedagogy to a variety of institutions. The LC-DLMs have proven effective at addressing student perceptions related to hydraulic loss and venturi meter flow measurements. Students at our institution typically think, before our intervention, that velocity decreases along a pipe due to friction, and that pressure increases in the throat of a venturi meter due to a squeezing effect. Current results are showing LC-DLM efficacy in improving student understanding and eliminating these otherwise persistent misconceptions in both chemical and mechanical engineering fluid mechanics courses within the same institution. Statistically significant improvements with large effect sizes are shown in understanding the associated continuity principles and energy transformations as described by Bernoulli’s equation. We postulate that the same misconceptions exist and that the same gains are possible for a number of implementation strategies at a variety of institutions and program types. We are analyzing and will present LC-DLM related learning data for the same concepts taught by a suite of professors in a variety of modes, within a classroom, through outside-of-class activities, and with distance education dining room table experiments. These additional classes consist of students in chemical and mechanical engineering, and process technology programs. The courses are being taught at main campus locations, satellite campuses and to people employed full-time in industry. We will discuss any differential achievements observed between the various approaches and the prospective rationale for any dissimilarities.

Beheshti Pour, N., & Kaiphanliam, K. M., & Nazempour, A., & Thiessen, D. B., & Richards, R. F., & Meng, F. S., & Adesope, O., & Wilson, S. A., & Englert, D. L., & Van Wie, B. J. (2018, June), Transference of Hands-on Desktop Learning Pedagogy Across Institution and Program Types Paper presented at 2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/31155

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