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Ufast – Practical Advice For Accelerating New Faculty Scholarship

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Conference

2010 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Louisville, Kentucky

Publication Date

June 20, 2010

Start Date

June 20, 2010

End Date

June 23, 2010

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Been There, Done That: Advice for New Faculty

Tagged Division

New Engineering Educators

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

15.1287.1 - 15.1287.13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/16583

Download Count

37

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Paper Authors

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Robert Garrick Rochester Institute of Technology

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ROBERT D. GARRICK, Rochester Institute of Technology, College of Applied Science and Technology.
Robert is an Associate Professor. He holds a BS in Electrical Engineering, MS in Mechanical Engineering, MBA Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, and a PE license in Mechanical Engineering. Prior to this academic position Robert worked 25 years in the automotive component industry. His primary research interests are in the domain of product realization, and energy efficient buildings. He can be reached at rdgmet@rit.edu or through Linkedin.com.

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Scott Anson Rochester Institute of Technology

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SCOTT J. ANSON, Rochester Institute of Technology, College of Applied Science and Technology. Scott is an Associate Professor and Program Chair of Manufacturing Engineering Technology. He also serves as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Applied Science & Engineering Technology jaset.rit.edu. He holds a BS and MS in Mechanical Engineering, a PE license in Mechanical Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Systems Science. His primary research interests are in the domain of electronics manufacturing including processes, materials and failure analyses.

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Mario Castro-Cedeno Rochester Institute of Technology

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MARIO H. CASTRO-CEDENO is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Technology and Packaging Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) in Rochester, NY. He teaches courses in computer aided design to engineering technology undergraduates. Before joining RIT in December of 2003 he accumulated 30 years of engineering and management experience at various firms, including NASA and General Electric. Mr. Castro-Cedeno was born in Puerto Rico and obtained his B.S. and M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Puerto Rico and a Master degree in Materials Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley.

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Elizabeth Dell Rochester Institute of Technology

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ELIZABETH DELL is an Assistant Professor of Manufacturing & Mechanical Engineering Technology at the Rochester Institute of Technology. She is the Program Chair for Undeclared Engineering Technology. Dell received her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Kettering University and has an MS in Macromolecular Science & Engineering from the University of Michigan. She has worked in the automotive industry in the development of plastic products from fuel system components to interior trim. Research interests include sustainable materials development, characterization, and application and increasing the diversity of the engineering workforce.

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Christopher Greene University of Alabama

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CHRISTOPHER GREENE, Rochester Institute of Technology, College of Applied Science and Technology. Christopher is an Assistant Professor. He received his B.S. in Applied Physics from Syracuse University, M.S. in Industrial Engineering from Binghamton University, and a PhD in Systems Science with a specialization in Manufacturing Systems also from Binghamton University. His teaching interests pertain to manufacturing systems. His research interests are continual process improvement methodologies applied to such industries as electronics, automotive, and healthcare. Prior to his academic position, he worked in the Microelectronics Division of IBM.

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Carol Romanowski Rochester Institute of Technology

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CAROL ROMANOWSKI, Rochester Institute of Technology, College of Applied Science and Technology Carol is an assistant professor. She earned her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from the University at Buffalo, SUNY. Her research and teaching interests include data mining, maintenance and reliability, quality, and decision support for engineering design.

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Michael Slifka Rochester Institute of Technology (CAST)

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MICHAEL SLIFKA, Rochester Institute of Technology, College of Applied Science and Technology. Michael is an Assistant Professor. He received his B.S. in Manufacturing Engineering Technology and his M.S. in Manufacturing and Mechanical System Integration, both from RIT. His research and teaching interests include new methods in teaching engineering education leveraging the environments of today’s students, and using Mind Mapping techniques integrally in the teaching of classes. Prior to his academic position, he spent 30 years in Product Development for the commercial, medical, aerospace, and military industries.

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Larry Villasmil Rochester Institute of Technology

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LARRY VILLASMIL, Rochester Institute of Technology, College of Applied Science and Technology Larry is an Assistant Professor. He holds a BS in Mechanical Engineering from “Universidad Nacional Experimental del Táchira” in Venezuela, and a M.Sc. and PhD. degrees from Texas A&M University in College Station , Texas. Prior to this academic position, Larry worked for 12 years in the Oil Exploration and Production Industry as a Rotating Equipment Specialist. His primary research interests are computational fluid dynamics and turbulence modeling applied to turbo machinery, energy conversion, manufacturing processes and fluid power.

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James Lee Rochester Institute of Technology (CAST)

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JAMES H. LEE, Rochester Institute of Technology, College of Applied Science and Technology. James is an Assistant Professor. He is a Professional Engineer who received his B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering from California Polytechnic State University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Texas A&M University. His research and teaching interests include energy systems, engines for alternative fuels, and building energy efficiency. Prior to his academic position James developed advanced powertrains for General Motors.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

UFAST – Practical Advice for Accelerating New Faculty Scholarship

Abstract The issue of accelerating faculty scholarship is a key item especially for new/untenured faculty. New faculty future career success depends on developing scholarship productivity quickly. Previous research has shown how mentoring new faculty at the early stages of their career has had significant impact on new faculty success. Mentorship is especially important at institutions that have an increasing demand for faculty scholarship. The new untenured faculty must also learn and balance teaching and service responsibilities. In addition to essential mentoring of untenured faculty by senior faculty, untenured faculty can also benefit from peer mentoring by other untenured faculty. This paper reviews practical advice for creating a collaborative, untenured faculty peer scholarship team, in our case called Untenured Faculty Accelerated Scholarship Team (UFAST). In this paper, the authors will discuss what drove the need to form UFAST and the practical advice which has been developed by the UFAST team. This paper will also provide an account of individual experiences in developing scholarship agendas as new faculty. The authors conclude with the advice that operating as a collegial and collaborative scholarship team, especially one whose members’ existence depends on the team’s success, allows the untenured faculty members to quickly share, support, and achieve individual scholarship success.

Introduction Beginning a new career as a faculty member in higher education has many challenges, among these is developing new course material, completing your service goals, attracting and supervising student assistants, and developing your individual funded scholarship foci. Several excellent resources exist to assist new faculty as they develop their individual teaching styles,[1-5] but in the authors’ experience practical advice is lacking for new faculty to develop and accelerate their scholarship productivity. Therefore, this paper will provide practical advice and individual experiences in operating as an untenured faculty scholarship team.

Rochester Institute of Technology is a teaching institution focused on career-oriented education enjoying a good reputation regionally. Like many universities the institution is in the process of refocusing faculty priorities toward more research and scholarship than has been done in the past. Because many faculty have not been research-active, it is crucial for them to quickly develop their scholarship foci, and research plans to allow them to achieve tenure.

A successful tenure program requires a balance of teaching, scholarship, and service; however, developing a robust research and scholarship agenda while trying to maintain the excellence in teaching and a broad service agenda is a challenge. In addition, teaching-oriented colleges often lack research laboratories, have a very limited number of graduate students, and offer little or no startup funds to new faculty. Because of economic constraints, both administrators and faculty are being asked to do more with less support [6]. Simply put, the “action figure” portrait of today’s engineering/engineering technology professor[7], who has to do it all—from top-notch lesson plans to award-winning research—has become our reality.

Garrick, R., & Anson, S., & Castro-Cedeno, M., & Dell, E., & Greene, C., & Romanowski, C., & Slifka, M., & Villasmil, L., & Lee, J. (2010, June), Ufast – Practical Advice For Accelerating New Faculty Scholarship Paper presented at 2010 Annual Conference & Exposition, Louisville, Kentucky. https://peer.asee.org/16583

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2010 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015