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Use Of Case Studies At Hampton University: Results Of Implementation

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Marketing Engineering to Minority Students

Tagged Division

Minorities in Engineering

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

13.1320.1 - 13.1320.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/4237

Download Count

38

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Paper Authors

author page

Qiang Le Hampton University

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Chetan Sankar Auburn University

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P.K. Raju Auburn University

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Use of Case Studies at Hampton University: Results of Implementation Qiang Le Chetan S Sankar Department of Electrical Engineering Department of Management Hampton University Auburn University Hampton, VA 23668 Auburn, AL 36849 qiang.le@hamptonu.edu sankacs@auburn.edu

Abstract

The nation’s current and projected need for more Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) workers, coupled with the chronically lagging participation of students from ethnically growing segments of the population, argue for policies and programs that will increase the pathways into engineering. Past research has indicated that compared to traditional instructional methods, student-oriented instructional methods such as multi-media case studies that encourage student participation and active involvement in learning are better ways to accomplish these objectives. This paper discusses the results of implementing the Laboratory for Innovative Technology and Engineering Education (LITEE) case studies in an engineering class at Hampton University (HU), a HBCU. Two case studies, Mauritius Auditorium Design and Lorn Textiles, were used in an Introduction to Engineering class. Students were given one class period to analyze the case studies and then required to make presentations during the second class period. Questionnaires were administered at the conclusion of the experiment. Analysis of the student responses show that the students at Hampton University perceived that they had achieved the goals of improving team working skills, showing strong interest in engineering subjects, and improving their higher-order cognitive skills. The instructor reported that the students were engrossed on their work and had lively debates. The results show the need for incorporating multi-media case studies in engineering curriculum.

Introduction

The nation’s current and projected need for more Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) workers, coupled with the chronically lagging participation of students from ethnically growing segments of the population, argue for policies and programs that will increase the pathways into engineering. Enhancing the curriculum is recognized to be an important way to improve overall diversity in engineering. Retooling curricula to prepare students for the innovation age requires them to explore open-ended problems, thereby acquiring higher-order cognitive and teamwork skills and equipping them with the tools they will need to become successful engineers. Past research has indicated that compared to traditional instructional methods, student-oriented instructional methods such as multi-media case studies that encourage student participation and active involvement in learning are better ways to accomplish these objectives [1]. Many of the new skills needed to succeed in the innovation age can be achieved through the case study pedagogy. This pedagogy may be particularly effective for African- American students, who prefer team-based interactive environments and whose learning styles might be different than those of traditional engineering students [2]. The Laboratory for Innovative Technology and Engineering Education at Auburn University (LITEE) has developed

Le, Q., & Sankar, C., & Raju, P. (2008, June), Use Of Case Studies At Hampton University: Results Of Implementation Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/4237

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