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Using Commercially Available Finite Element Software For Fatigue Analysis

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Conference

2005 Annual Conference

Location

Portland, Oregon

Publication Date

June 12, 2005

Start Date

June 12, 2005

End Date

June 15, 2005

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

New Approaches & Techniques in Engineering II

Page Count

14

Page Numbers

10.1404.1 - 10.1404.14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/15230

Download Count

739

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Paper Authors

author page

Cyrus Hagigat

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 3662

Using Commercially Available Finite Element Software for Fatigue Analysis Cyrus K. Hagigat Engineering Technology Department College of Engineering The University of Toledo Toledo, Ohio 43606

I: Introduction Fatigue analysis is a branch of the science of fracture mechanics. It is widely known that a metal subjected to a repetitive fluctuating load will eventually fail at a load much lower than that required to cause fracture on a single application of the load.

Fatigue failures can be grouped into two broad categories of “Low Cycle Fatigue” and “High Cycle Fatigue”.

The primary cause of failure in “Low Cycle Fatigue” is large strain fluctuations. For example, extreme temperature fluctuations can cause large strain fluctuations. Another possible cause of large strain fluctuations is the large variation in centripetal forces in a high speed rotating machine during acceleration and deceleration.

The primary cause of failure in ‘High Cycle Fatigue” is fluctuating stress levels. For example, fluctuating stresses can be caused by vibration caused by a minor imbalance in a high speed rotating part.

The primary analytical technique for analyzing “Low Cycle Fatigue” is the strain-life technique, and the primary analytical technique for analyzing “High Cycle Fatigue” is the stress-life technique. The finite element technique enables one to determine the stress and strain levels for complicated geometries and loading conditions.

This article contains the background information and introduces concepts that illustrate the use of commercial finite element software as an aid in teaching fatigue analysis. The use of the finite element technique will enable an instructor to move beyond presenting simple geometries and loading conditions, and will thereby allow the teaching of fatigue analysis techniques involving real world geometries, boundary and loading conditions.

II: Cyclic Loading Fatigue failure is a byproduct of cyclic loading. Figures 1, 2 and 3 illustrate typical fatigue loading (stress) cycles.

Proceedings of the 2005 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2005, American Society for Engineering Education

Hagigat, C. (2005, June), Using Commercially Available Finite Element Software For Fatigue Analysis Paper presented at 2005 Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon. https://peer.asee.org/15230

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