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Using Expert Systems Technology To Teach Earthquake Resistant Design Of Buildings

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Conference

2000 Annual Conference

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Publication Date

June 18, 2000

Start Date

June 18, 2000

End Date

June 21, 2000

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

9

Page Numbers

5.692.1 - 5.692.9

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/8810

Download Count

131

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Paper Authors

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Abbes Berrais

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 1315

Using Expert Systems Technology to Teach Earthquake Resistant Design of Buildings

Abbes Berrais Abha College of Technology, POB 238, Abha, Saudi Arabia

Abstract

Computers have been introduced as an element into the teaching environment for a long time now. Until recently, computers have been used for relatively routine calculations such as: report writing, spreadsheets, drafting, and simple simulations. Very rarely are computers used to help teach and visualize fundamental concepts, or to explore the alternative solutions of a design project. Today the most interesting and exciting branch in computer applications is expert systems technology. Expert system technology can play a great role in enhancing the processes of teaching and learning in engineering education.

This paper addresses the impact of Expert Systems (ES) technology in providing the necessary support for developing earthquake engineering computer-aided education. An introduction to ES technology is briefly presented. Then, the benefits from the application of ES in engineering education are outlined. A theoretical strategy is proposed for developing ES prototypes for engineering education purposes. An educational prototype ES for teaching earthquake resistant design of buildings is briefly presented. The prototype was developed using a SUN SPARCstation under the UNIX operating system, and using Quintec-Prolog, Quintec-Flex, and FORTRAN 77 as programming environment. The paper concludes with a summary and recommendations on future impact of artificial intelligence and ES technologies on computer-aided engineering education.

1. Introduction

Computers have been introduced as an element into the teaching environment for a long time now. Until recently, computers have been used for relatively routine calculations such as: report writing, spreadsheets, drafting, and simple simulations. Very rarely are computers used to help teach and visualize fundamental concepts, or to explore the alternative solutions of a 1 design project . The integration of computers in higher education is still minimal in subjects that require symbolic reasoning such as designs problems. The nature of civil engineering problems is known to be complex, three-dimensional, and dynamic. Solutions to these problems require the use of advanced computer technologies for complex mathematical simulation, computation, communication, and manipulation and storage of data. Educating a student in a specific subject requires techniques in directing the learning process to the best output of the student. Computer-aided education tools are required to assist students in learning how to perform practical design problems and how to perform “What-If” design 2 scenarios . To fulfill these requirements, universities and colleges should incorporate special courses on “computer-aided engineering education” which are aimed at the application of computers to solve engineering problems. This proposal is intended to help students to learn and get experience more quickly compared to, for example, using conventional techniques (such as Books and Blackboard). A combination of theory with software applications is recommended in elementary courses. Students should learn the basic computing skills and computerized structural and design methods.

Berrais, A. (2000, June), Using Expert Systems Technology To Teach Earthquake Resistant Design Of Buildings Paper presented at 2000 Annual Conference, St. Louis, Missouri. https://peer.asee.org/8810

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