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Using Lever Analogy Diagrams In Teaching Compound Planetary Gear Trains

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Innovations in Mechanical Engineering Education

Tagged Division

Mechanical Engineering

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

11.1393.1 - 11.1393.11

DOI

10.18260/1-2--627

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/627

Download Count

5569

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Paper Authors

biography

Gene Liao Wayne State University

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Dr. Liao received the B.S.M.E. from National Central University, Taiwan; M.S.M.E. from the University of Texas; Mechanical Engineer from Columbia University; and the Doctor of Engineering degree from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He is currently an assistant professor at the Wayne State University. He has over 15 years of industrial practices in the automotive sector prior to becoming a faculty member.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Using Lever Analogy Diagrams in Teaching Compound Planetary Gear Trains

Abstract

The planetary gear trains are widely used in many automotive, aerospace and marine applications. The planetary gear trains are introduced to undergraduate mechanical engineering students in the course of Kinematics and Dynamics of Machines. Traditional methods of analyzing planetary gear trains, by means of torque and speed calculations, tend to be slow and cumbersome. The complexity involved has, no doubt, kept many students from becoming familiar with the capability of planetary gearing. It is our intent in this paper to describe the lever analogy method of analysis and to present a miniature ‘cookbook’ of levers for various planetary arrangements.

1. Introduction

The planetary gear trains, also known as epicyclic gear drives, are widely used in many automotive, aerospace and marine applications. The planetary type mechanism is the most used mechanical mechanism in conventional automatic transmissions for the majority of passenger cars. As an application in automotive automatic transmission, the number of speed ratios is determined by the kinematic structure and corresponding clutching sequence of its planetary gear train.

The planetary gear trains are introduced to undergraduate mechanical engineering students in the course of Kinematics and Dynamics of Machines. Traditional methods of analyzing planetary gear trains, by means of torque and speed calculations, tend to be slow and cumbersome. The complexity involved has, no doubt, kept many students from becoming familiar with the capability of planetary gearing. It seems appropriate in the Kinematics and Dynamics of Machines course to present a simpler method of analyzing and characterizing gear trains. The method is called the Lever Analogy Diagrams which are commonly utilized in industry1-4.

The lever analogy diagram is very useful in analyzing gear train that has more than two connected planetary gear sets. For a single planetary gear set, it is no need to add a level of abstraction. The lever analogy is a translational-system representation of the rotating parts for the planetary gear. In the lever analogy, an entire compound planetary gear train can usually be

Liao, G. (2006, June), Using Lever Analogy Diagrams In Teaching Compound Planetary Gear Trains Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. 10.18260/1-2--627

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