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Using Motivational Theory to Implement S-STEM Activities Supporting Student Success

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Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

Motivation, Goal Orientation, Identity, and Career Aspirations

Tagged Division

Educational Research and Methods

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

22

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/37993

Download Count

58

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Paper Authors

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Tris Utschig Kennesaw State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-1057-3825

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Dr. Tristan T. Utschig is Director for Scholarly Teaching in the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) and is Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering at Kennesaw State University. Formerly, he was Assistant Director for CETL and the Office of Assessment at Georgia Tech, and prior to that was a tenured Associate Professor of Engineering Physics at Lewis-Clark State College. Dr. Utschig consults with faculty across the university about bringing scholarly teaching and learning innovations into their classroom and assessing their impact. He has regularly published and presented work on a variety of topics including assessment instruments and methodologies, using technology in the classroom, faculty development in instructional design, teaching diversity, and peer coaching. Dr. Utschig completed his PhD in Nuclear Engineering at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

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Valmiki Sooklal Kennesaw State University

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Research interests are focused primarily in laser/material interaction, sustainable housing and engineering education.

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Margaret L. Lowder Kennesaw State University

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M. Loraine Lowder is the Assistant Dean of Accreditation and Assessment at Kennesaw State University. She received her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, M.S. in Mechanical Engineering, and Ph.D. in Bioengineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Dr. Lowder’s research interests include image processing, computer-aided engineering, and cardiovascular biomechanics. She is also interested in performing research in the area of the scholarship of teaching and learning.

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Chan Ham Kennesaw State University

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He is a Professor in Robotics and Mechatronics Engineering at the Kennesaw State University. He has over twenty years of experience in Mechatronics education and research.

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Renee Butler Kennesaw State University

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Renee J. Butler, Ph.D., P.E. is the associate dean for the Southern Polytechnic College of Engineering and Engineering Technology and a professor of Industrial and Systems Engineering.

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Abstract

This research paper describes the early results from a scholarship program that has been initiated with an overall goal to increase degree completion of low-income, high-achieving undergraduates with demonstrated financial need in engineering. The project will achieve four major objectives: 1) provide scholarships 2) engage students with engineering faculty and industry partners; 3) create community among students; and 4) facilitate undergraduate research. Research questions aligned with the project objectives will address the following areas: RQ1: influence of mentorship on feelings of intellectual belonging? RQ2: influence of community building on experience RQ3: influence of participation in socially conscious research on intent to persist. We describe how expectancy-value-cost motivational theory is used to implement programming addressing these questions and analyze field notes and survey data to investigate how project programming may impact expectancy for success, value accrued, and costs for participation on the part of students.

Utschig, T., & Sooklal, V., & Lowder, M. L., & Ham, C., & Butler, R. (2021, July), Using Motivational Theory to Implement S-STEM Activities Supporting Student Success Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. https://peer.asee.org/37993

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