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Using Performance Modeling as a Vehicle for Re-Integration

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Conference

2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Vancouver, BC

Publication Date

June 26, 2011

Start Date

June 26, 2011

End Date

June 29, 2011

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

"Green" Topics in Architectural Engineering

Tagged Division

Architectural

Page Count

29

Page Numbers

22.1629.1 - 22.1629.29

DOI

10.18260/1-2--18350

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/18350

Download Count

261

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Paper Authors

biography

Jacob Dunn University of Idaho Integrated Design Lab, Boise

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Jacob Dunn recently graduated with his Masters of Architecture from the University of Idaho with the AIA Henry Adams Medal of Honor. At the university, Jacob was highly involved with student organizations such as the AIAS and Focus the Nation. During his education, Jacob spent a summer abroad in Italy to study architecture and also worked at the ARUP branch in London for seven months in the Foresight + Innovation and Incubation department. Currently, Jacob is a research assistant at the Integrated Design Lab in Boise, where he deals with building simulation and develops passive design strategies. In 2010, Jacob also started his own business called ENlight Design LLC, which specializes in energy and daylight modeling for both commercial and residential projects.

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Gunnar Ryan Gladics University of Idaho, Integrated Design Lab

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Gunnar Gladics is a Research Scientist at the University of Idaho specializing in architectural energy efficiency. He directs the professional outreach and technical assistance program at the Integrated Design Lab (IDL), Boise. In addition to consulting with local and regional firms on daylighting and whole building energy efficiency, he conducts research for Idaho Power Company in the field of energy measurement and human factors in buildings. Gunnar has a B.Arch from the University of Idaho in Moscow and an M.Arch from the University of Idaho, Idaho Urban Research and Design Center, a winner of the Architectural Research Centers Consortium (ARCC) King Student Medal for architectural and environmental research. Gunnar has previous experience in the construction industry and has completed his mandatory internship time with NCARB in the architectural design field. He has served as a board member of the Sun Valley Sustainability Conference from 2007 – 2010.

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Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg University of Idaho Integrated Design Lab, Boise

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Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg is an Assistant Professor at the University of Idaho and Director of the Integrated Design Lab in Boise (IDL-Boise). He has degrees in architecture from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and University of Washington. Van Den Wymelenberg opened the IDL-Boise in 2004 for the University of Idaho and has successfully secured/completed grants for the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, United States Environment Protection Agency, Idaho Power Company, the Lighting Research Center, and the New Buildings Institute. As part of the Pacific Northwest Integrated Design Lab Network Van Den Wymelenberg has consulted on over 450 new construction and major renovation projects with architects and engineers regarding daylight and energy in buildings since 2000.

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Ery Djunaedy University of Idaho Integrated Design Lab, Boise

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Ery Djunaedy, Ph.D. is a Research Scientist (Building Physics Specialist) at the IDL, University of Idaho Boise. He has degrees in the area of Building Physics/Science from the Institut Teknologi Bandung, Indonesia, National University of Singapore, and Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Netherlands. His main interest is in building performance simulation, especially the building energy and airflow simulation. He has used advanced simulation tools like the energy and computational fluid dynamics simulations to design high performance buildings. He has taught building physics courses to architecture students in the Netherlands, the UAE and now in the US. He has been involved in various building design projects in Boise, Idaho and throughout the region since 2006 when he first joined the IDL.

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Sherry McKibben University of Idaho IURDC, McKibben + Cooper Architects

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Sherry is McKibben is University of Idaho Associate Professor of Architecture and Director of the University of Idaho’s Idaho Urban Research and Design Center (IURDC) in Boise. Sherry has a B.Arch. from the University of Oregon, a M.Arch. degree from Yale University, and is U.S. Green Building Council LEED accredited. She founded the UI Integrated Design Lab and continues to work with Director Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg to educate building professionals and promote energy efficiency. Sherry is also an architect and urban designer with the Treasure Valley architecture and urban design firm of McKibben + Cooper Architects/Urban Design. McKibben + Cooper specializes in sustainable urban design, architecture and site technologies, including master planning.

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Abstract

Using Performance Modeling as a Vehicle to Reintegrate the Design Process One of the biggest challenges in today’s building design industryrevolves around the management of an integrated team. Previous workflowbetween the design professions involved giving engineering consultants rigidlydefined problems and variables to design systems around, but the growingneed to achieve deeper energy savings has proven this process ineffective. Thefull integration of energy and daylight modeling early in the design processhas the potential to redefine the working relationship for both academic andprofessional praxis. Figure 1.1 communicates that even though the level ofarchitectural and engineering involvement will be unbalanced throughoutmost of the design process, a certain level of involvement is still required byboth parties throughout the entire project development to achieve deeperenergy savings. Figure 1.2 shows the outcome of this type of integrated designprocess and how it can lead to higher energy savings. Perhaps one of the most important aspects of utilizing energy modelingthroughout the design process it requires involvement from multipleprofessions. For example, as architects use energy modeling early on toanalyze building orientation, form, and envelope to lower primary buildingloads, input is needed from the engineers on how to specify the HVAC systemsobjects in the energy model. Everything from envelope design, insulationcontent, coefficient of performances, boiler efficiency curves, and sizingspecifications can be worked on concurrently by the two professions. Duringthe second half of the design process, architects can use passive designcontrols developed through the energy model to inform the HVAC equipmentspecifications and control mechanisms to ensure passive systems intent is notlost. In an academic setting this shared process would be essential for thesuccessful collaboration of engineering and design students, both groups standto learn a great deal from each other given a relevant medium through whichto communicate. Engineering students will learn that their input at the earlystages of shaping a building can have tremendous effect on the energy outcomes and in turn architectural students will better understand basic buildingphysics and systems design process. Even in professional practice, this closecollaboration is crucial in achieving high performance buildings andcontinuous improvement of the integrated modeling design process. Thispaper proposes that a simultaneous energy and daylighting modeling processcan be the vehicle to develop the skills necessary for professional engineersand students to work in tandem with building designers and architects.

Dunn, J., & Gladics, G. R., & Van Den Wymelenberg, K., & Djunaedy, E., & McKibben, S. (2011, June), Using Performance Modeling as a Vehicle for Re-Integration Paper presented at 2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Vancouver, BC. 10.18260/1-2--18350

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