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Using Real Time Sensors In The Engineering Classroom: The Ongoing Development Of An Engineering Education Experiment

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Conference

2005 Annual Conference

Location

Portland, Oregon

Publication Date

June 12, 2005

Start Date

June 12, 2005

End Date

June 15, 2005

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

4

Page Numbers

10.1423.1 - 10.1423.4

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/14949

Download Count

22

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Paper Authors

author page

Elizabeth A. Stephan

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 1526

Using Real-Time Sensors in the Engineering Classroom: The Ongoing Development of an Engineering Education Experiment

Matthew W. Ohland and Elizabeth A. Stephan General Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634

Abstract

Clemson’s NSF-sponsored EXPerimental Engineering in Real-Time (EXPERT) project is investigating the effect of using real-time sensors on student learning through graphical representations of various physical concepts and to facilitate learning the concept itself. This paper will address the development and adaptation of the experiment as a model for other engineering education experiments, describing the ongoing challenge of implementing an experimental protocol in a classroom environment, the expansion of the experimental protocol to include other test sites, and how formative assessment shaped the educational experiment.

Introduction

The goals and methods of Clemson’s EXPerimental Engineering in Real-Time project have been described in detail in our earlier work.1,2,3 We seek to use real-time sensors in the classroom to provide quicker feedback to students during hands-on laboratory modules. To establish the efficacy of using the real-time sensors to improve student learning, an educational experiment was carefully designed to evaluate the laboratories in actual classroom situations, when used by various instructors, and when compared to laboratories that are pedagogically similar except that real-time sensors are not used.

In fall 2004, changes to the experiment design and project management were required due to the construction of a classroom to use student-centered activities in a large-enrollment classroom.4-9 There were changes related to the use of different classroom facilities, a change in class size from 44 to 72, a change in the number of students per table from 4 to 8, and a change in the number of lab sections from 20 to 12. In addition, another laboratory experiment was added to the experimental design to provide a more definitive experiment.

The experimental design for Fall 2004

In Fall 2004, three laboratories were used to provide a more definitive experiment. This allowed for use of the sensors in certain sections for the first lab, crossover of the intervention to other sections for the second lab, and the continuation of the intervention in those sections for the third lab. This required the development of a third lab that could be delivered in “sensor” and “non- sensor versions” that were otherwise pedagogically equivalent. Parallel versions of a fluid- mixing laboratory were developed for this purpose, and are detailed separately in these conference proceedings.10

Proceedings of the 2005 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2005, American Society for Engineering Education

Stephan, E. A., & Ohland, M. (2005, June), Using Real Time Sensors In The Engineering Classroom: The Ongoing Development Of An Engineering Education Experiment Paper presented at 2005 Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon. https://peer.asee.org/14949

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