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Virtual Prototyping: A Bridge Between Design And Manufacturing

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Incorporating Projects into the Curriculum

Tagged Division

Mechanical Engineering

Page Count

14

Page Numbers

11.1433.1 - 11.1433.14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/300

Download Count

119

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Paper Authors

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Shanzhong (Shawn) Duan South Dakota State University

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Shanzhong (Shawn) Duan is an assistant professor of Mechanical Engineering Department in the College of Engineering at South Dakota State University.

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Li Qian South Dakota State University

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Li Qian is an assistant professor of Engineering Technology and Management Department in the College of Engineering at South Dakota State University.

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Teresa Hall South Dakota State University

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Teresa Hall is Professor and Department Head of Engineering Technology and Management in the College of Engineering at South Dakota State University.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Virtual Prototyping: A Bridge between Design and Manufacturing

Abstract

This paper intends to study integration of design curriculum and manufacturing curriculum via virtual prototyping. Design and manufacturing are two important subject areas in most engineering schools. Various courses are offered in these two areas. However under the current curriculum setting, the design program and manufacturing program have been developed discretely without regard to the potential benefits provided by the integration of both of them due to lack of a curricular bridge to properly link them together.

Virtual prototyping, which is also called dynamic motion simulation, is one possible solution to this problem. Virtual prototyping usually is delivered in a computational multibody dynamics (CMD) course. The CMD course is designed to build basic motion and force analysis skills of a student to inform his/her design and make the design ready for manufacturing. Introducing standalone computational multibody dynamics course is the first alternative to tie design and manufacturing together via virtual prototyping.

Virtual prototyping can also be included as a section of a computer-aided design /computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) course to link design and manufacturing. A new course entitled Applied Multibody Dynamics was initiated in the mechanical engineering program at South Dakota State University. This new course has addressed the need for engineering design linked to manufacturing. To make the course substantially fulfill its role of a bridge between the design curriculum and manufacturing curriculum, the course outcomes have been tied to the students’ senior design projects. Student surveys and course assessments indicate that the course plan and design provides a promising solution to the need for integration between design curriculum and manufacturing curriculum.

Introduction

Design curriculum and manufacturing curriculum are two key subject areas in many engineering programs. Specific requirements in curricula may vary, but they encounter similar issues and challenges as far as design concept through final manufacturing production is concerned. The engineering design program and manufacturing program at South Dakota State University (SDSU) face a similar challenge.

Duan, S. S., & Qian, L., & Hall, T. (2006, June), Virtual Prototyping: A Bridge Between Design And Manufacturing Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. https://peer.asee.org/300

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