Asee peer logo

What's in the Soup? Auto-ethnograhies from an Engineer, a Physicist, and an English Professor Regarding a Successful Multidisciplinary Grand Challenge Program

Download Paper |

Conference

2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Indianapolis, Indiana

Publication Date

June 15, 2014

Start Date

June 15, 2014

End Date

June 18, 2014

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Integration of Engineering and Other Disciplines (Including Liberal Arts)

Tagged Divisions

Multidisciplinary Engineering and Liberal Education/Engineering & Society

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

24.1370.1 - 24.1370.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/23303

Download Count

23

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Anneliese Watt Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

visit author page

Anneliese Watt is Professor of English at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. She teaches and researches technical and professional communication, rhetoric and composition, medicine in literature, and other humanities elective courses to engineering and science students. Her graduate work in rhetoric and literature was completed at Penn State, and her recent research often focuses on engineering and workplace communication as well as medical humanities.

visit author page

biography

Scott Kirkpatrick Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

visit author page

Scott Kirkpatrick is an Assistant Professor of Physics and Optical Engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. He teaches physics, semiconductor processes, and micro electrical and mechanical systems (MEMS). His research interests include heat engines, magnetron sputtering, and nanomaterial self assembly. His masters thesis work at the University of Nebraska Lincoln focused on reactive sputtering process control. His doctoral dissertation at the University of Nebraska Lincoln investigated High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering.

visit author page

biography

Ashley Bernal Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

visit author page

Ashley Bernal is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. She received her PhD from Georgia Institute of Technology in 2011. She was an American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) teaching fellow and Student Teaching Enhancement Partnership (STEP) Fellow. Prior to receiving her PhD, she worked as a subsystems engineer at Boeing on the Joint Unmanned Combat Air Systems (JUCAS) program. Her research areas of interest include piezoelectrics, nanomanufacturing, optical measuring techniques, and intercultural design.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

The authors (professors of mechanical engineering, physics, and professional communication)collaboratively designed and taught an intensive 10-week summer multidisciplinary design program inwhich undergraduate engineering and science students earned credit for three courses by tackling theNational Academy of Engineering (NAE) Grand Challenge to produce solar energy economically.Working in teams students designed, built, tested, and communicated an inexpensive and locallymanufacturable system that utilized solar energy for individuals in Kenya. The program has attractedpositive media coverage from both general audience and engineering education forums: localnewspaper and television stories, U.S. News and World Report, and ASEE First Bell. Due to the successof this pilot program, we seek to extract the elements that led to the fruitful collaboration for both thestudents and the faculty. Using as a framework Borrego and Newswander’s “Characteristics ofSuccessful Cross-disciplinary Engineering Education Collaborations,” we will provide parallelethnographies to reflect on our own multidisciplinary experiences regarding course development, teamteaching, student outcome evaluation, and professional development. The reflections will focus on theprocess and motivation for the collaboration, methods for selecting problem and course theme,workload distribution, and our own perceptions of the quality and value from the learning experience aswell as rewards. We will then analyze the conclusions from each of our disciplinary perspectives andshare with the community of engineering educators our ideas regarding why the program was a success.

Watt, A., & Kirkpatrick, S., & Bernal, A. (2014, June), What's in the Soup? Auto-ethnograhies from an Engineer, a Physicist, and an English Professor Regarding a Successful Multidisciplinary Grand Challenge Program Paper presented at 2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Indianapolis, Indiana. https://peer.asee.org/23303

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2014 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015