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What’s So Important About Peer Review Of Teaching Portfolio Components? An Exploratory Analysis Of Peer Review Episodes Within Etpp

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

ERM Potpourri

Tagged Division

Educational Research and Methods

Page Count

19

Page Numbers

11.1446.1 - 11.1446.19

DOI

10.18260/1-2--1259

Permanent URL

https://216.185.13.174/1259

Download Count

78

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Paper Authors

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Jennifer Turns University of Washington

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Jennifer Turns is an assistant professor in the Department of Technical Communication at the University of Washington. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her interests include engineering education, learner-centered design, user-centered design, and audience analysis. Dr. Turns is currently working on multiple NSF grants dealing with engineering education including an NSF Career award exploring the impact of portfolio construction on engineering students’ professional identity.

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Jessica Yellin University of Washington

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Jessica Yellin is a Research Scientist for the Scholarship on Teaching element of the
Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education (CAEE). She holds a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Washington with dissertation research on structural vibration and damping of acoustic noise in thin-walled structures.

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Yi-Min Huang University of Washington

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Yi-Min Huang is a Research Scientist for the Scholarship on Teaching element of the Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education (CAEE). She holds a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from Washington State University. Her research interests include assessment and evaluation.

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Kathleen Gygi University of Washington

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Kathleen Gygi is a doctoral student in Technical Communication at the University of Washington. Her research interests include the nature of competence in professional practice and the pedagogy of teaching.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

What’s so important about peer review of teaching portfolio components? An exploratory analysis of peer review episodes Abstract: Understanding and promoting effective teaching are central concerns of the engineering education community. In this paper, we report on research to investigate the processes by which construction of teaching portfolios in a socially supportive context can promote the advancement of teaching knowledge and ability. We believe that by characterizing how one specific intervention can advance teaching knowledge and effectiveness, we can generate findings and ideas that can help others engaged in the same goal.

Introduction

Understanding and promoting effective teaching are central concerns of the engineering education community since effective teaching can not only improve student learning, but also increase student motivation, persistence, and retention. Because teaching is complex, the approaches for improving teaching are necessarily diverse. Approaches include workshops on specific teaching techniques, individual consultations where educators get advice on individual challenges, creation of websites and books with teaching information, and development of communities of practice around teaching. But what do we know about practices such as these? Answers to this question, and strategies for answering this question, can be of interest to those faculty developers, instructional consultants, and others who are interested in helping educators advance their teaching.

Any approach to advance teaching will likely need to address two issues. First, the approach will need to be a learning event in that teachers are succeeding in learning something (e.g., new teaching techniques, new ways to think about students) that will help them improve their teaching. This might be considered effectiveness by traditional definitions. Second, the approach will need to fit into the complex schedules and contexts of educators since simply spending time learning about teaching may not be possible. For example, given that engineering educators (and future educators in the form of graduate students) are busy, approaches may need to help them solve actual problems they are encountering or be aligned with other requirements that the educators must meet (e.g., preparing materials for annual merit review or tenure review, getting a job). Such a framing suggests two questions that can be asked for any approach to help educators become better educators: a) to what extent does the approach lead to learning of knowledge and skills related to teaching and b) what outcomes other than learning about teaching do participants derive from the approach.

In our work, we have been focusing on one particular strategy – having individuals (primarily future engineering educators in the form of graduate students) create teaching portfolios through a scaffolded process and in a group oriented environment. Participants in our Engineering Teaching Portfolio Program (ETPP) prepare a teaching portfolio consisting of a teaching philosophy, two to five annotated artifacts, and a diversity statement1. Peer review defined as reciprocal evaluation of written products was originally conceived as a core element of the program. Participants typically use at least half of each session to review the portfolio elements of their peers. To date, our research on this educational innovation has focused on the

Turns, J., & Yellin, J., & Huang, Y., & Gygi, K. (2006, June), What’s So Important About Peer Review Of Teaching Portfolio Components? An Exploratory Analysis Of Peer Review Episodes Within Etpp Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. 10.18260/1-2--1259

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2006 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015