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Why Inclusion Programs are Beneficial to Students with Disabilities and How Universities can Help: Perspectives of Students with Disabilities

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Conference

2018 CoNECD - The Collaborative Network for Engineering and Computing Diversity Conference

Location

Crystal City, Virginia

Publication Date

April 29, 2018

Start Date

April 29, 2018

End Date

May 2, 2018

Conference Session

Disability Track - Technical Session VI

Tagged Topic

Disability

Page Count

6

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/29593

Download Count

171

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Paper Authors

biography

Meenakshi Manas Das Mississippi State University

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Meenakshi Das is a junior computer science student at Mississippi State University and has an active interest in Accessibility in tech.

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biography

Sarah B. Lee Mississippi State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-3770-5480

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Sarah Lee joined the faculty at Mississippi State University after a 19 year information technology career at FedEx Corporation. Serving as Assistant Department Head and Director of Undergraduate Studies in Computer Science and Engineering, she works to create awareness and programs that encourage more women to enter the computing pathway and persist into computing majors and careers.

Sarah holds a BS in Business Administration and Computer Information Systems from the Mississippi University for Women and a master’s degree in computer science from MSU. She earned her PhD in computer science from the University of Memphis.

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Litany H. Lineberry Mississippi State University

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Chase Addison Barr

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Abstract

According to the Bureau of Labor statistics, "among people age 25 and older in 2014, 16.4 percent of people with a disability had completed at least a bachelor’s degree. By comparison, 34.6 percent of people with no disability had completed at least a bachelor’s degree. About 1 in 5 people with a disability had less than a high school diploma, compared with 1 in 10 people with no disability (2015).

The 2016 Disability Statistics Annual Report states, "34.9% of people with disabilities in the US ages 18-64 living in the community were employed compared to 76.0% for people without disabilities - a gap of 41.1 percentage points in 2015." Therefore, there is a huge need to bridge this gap and strive towards an equitable and inclusive world. Disability inclusion practices promote innovation and provide an accessible space where all abilities are embraced.

This paper will give a detailed overview of existing inclusion programs that have enabled persons with disabilities to thrive, with particular emphasis on the computing pathway. It will provide real-life examples of students and early college graduates who have benefited from intervention programs and explain why more of these initiatives are needed. Moreover, it will also provide a list of action steps for universities on how they can assist students with disabilities persist and transition into their professional careers.

Das, M. M., & Lee, S. B., & Lineberry, L. H., & Barr, C. A. (2018, April), Why Inclusion Programs are Beneficial to Students with Disabilities and How Universities can Help: Perspectives of Students with Disabilities Paper presented at 2018 CoNECD - The Collaborative Network for Engineering and Computing Diversity Conference, Crystal City, Virginia. https://peer.asee.org/29593

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