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WIP: Hands-on Engineering Mechanics with a Three-dimensional Laboratory Unit

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Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

Making Mechanics Courses Fun and More Effective

Tagged Division

Mechanics

Page Count

14

DOI

10.18260/1-2--35542

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/35542

Download Count

111

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Paper Authors

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Md Rashedul Hasan Sarker University of Indianapolis Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-2898-8981

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Md Rashedul H Sarker is an Assistant Professor at R.B. Annis School of Engineering at the University of Indianapolis (UIndy). Prior to joining at UIndy, he worked as a lecturer at The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP). He also earned his Ph.D. at UTEP. His teaching and research interests include active learning, project-based learning, energy harvesting, and developing sensors using multi-functional materials

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Najmus Saqib University of Indianapolis

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Najmus Saqib is an Assistant Professor in the R.B. Annis School of Engineering at the University of Indianapolis (UIndy). Saqib received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Colorado School of Mines (CSM), focusing on "Optical Diagnostics of Lithium-Sulfur and Lithium-Ion Battery Electrolytes using Attenuated Total Reflection Infrared Spectroscopy". He likes to use innovative pedagogical techniques to facilitate student learning.

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George D. Ricco University of Indianapolis

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George D. Ricco is an assistant professor of engineering and first-year engineering coordinator at the University of Indianapolis. He focuses his work between teaching the first two years of introductory engineering and engineering design and research in student progression. Previously, he was a special title series assistant professor in electrical engineering at the University of Kentucky, and the KEEN Program Coordinator at Gonzaga University in the School of Engineering and Applied Science. He completed his doctorate in engineering education from Purdue University’s School of Engineering Education. Previously, he received an M.S. in earth and planetary sciences studying geospatial imaging, and an M.S. in physics studying high-pressure, high-temperature FT-IR spectroscopy in heavy water, both from the University of California, Santa Cruz. He holds a B.S.E. in engineering physics with a concentration in electrical engineering from Case Western Reserve University. His academic interests include longitudinal analysis, visualization, semantics, team formation, gender issues, existential phenomenology, and lagomorph physiology.

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Megan Hammond University of Indianapolis

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Assistant Professor in the R.B. Annis School of Engineering at the University of Indianapolis.

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Jared Hilt

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James T. Emery II University of Indianapolis

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Abstract

A novel working station for demonstrating the fundamentals of engineering mechanics in both three- and two-dimensional spaces has been developed. The equipment allows undergraduate students to perform hands-on activities to aid their understanding of topics such as force components in multiple dimensions, vector dot products, vector cross products, and mixed triple products which are often difficult to visualize in three-dimensions. While several educational laboratory modules for mechanics courses currently available on the market can demonstrate basic two-dimensional systems, equipment that can accurately realize three-dimensional systems are rare. Also, these systems are often improvised and lack the necessary accuracy for multiple lab demonstrations. The experimental setup described herein consists of a highly customizable base unit and a variety of add-on tools, such as pulleys, force sensors, and hanging weights. These allow for accurate demonstration of the foundational principles of mechanics in three-dimensional spaces. The Engineering Mechanics Laboratory Unit (EMLU) has been built by a combined effort of faculty, staff, and students at the R. B. Annis School of Engineering at the University of Indianapolis (UIndy). The unit is currently being used by students enrolled in Statics (MENG 210) at the University of Indianapolis. Ongoing efforts include designing lab modules for use in additional courses, such as Dynamics (PHYS 360) and Mechanics of Solids (MENG 300). The efficacy of the EMLU is currently being assessed in the classroom using a mixed methodological approach. First, students’ perceptions of the apparatus and core concepts are analyzed using a reflective journaling protocol that is evaluated by a team of experts in mechanical engineering. Second, students provide detailed field ethnographic notes while engaging with the apparatus and the lab work itself. Third, student work is evaluated using a team of experts and compared to previous years’ evaluations that were undertaken without the implementation of this novel approach.

Sarker, M. R. H., & Saqib, N., & Ricco, G. D., & Hammond, M., & Hilt, J., & Emery, J. T. (2020, June), WIP: Hands-on Engineering Mechanics with a Three-dimensional Laboratory Unit Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--35542

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