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Work In Progress: Adapting Inexpensive Game Technology to Teach Principles of Neural Interface Technology and Device Control

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Conference

2013 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Atlanta, Georgia

Publication Date

June 23, 2013

Start Date

June 23, 2013

End Date

June 26, 2013

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Biomedical Engineering Poster Session

Tagged Division

Biomedical

Page Count

5

Page Numbers

23.1376.1 - 23.1376.5

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/22761

Download Count

18

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Paper Authors

biography

Benjamin R Campbell Robert Morris University

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Dr. Campbell is an assistant professor of engineering at Robert Morris University, where he advises biomedical engineering students. Prior to that he worked as a laser engineer at the Penn State Electro-Optics Center, specializing in ultrashort pulse laser micromachining research. Dr. Campbell is also on the board of directors for the Pennsylvania Governor's School for the Sciences Campaign, a nonprofit dedicated to providing free advanced education opportunities to encourage gifted students to pursue careers in science.

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A. Clayton Pozzi

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Abstract

Adapting Inexpensive Game Technology to Teach Principles of Neural Interface Technology and Device Control An inexpensive commercially available game that detects the brain’s beta wave activity tocontrol game function was analyzed by biomedical engineering students to teach principles of electricalengineering, device control and neural interface technology. Students disassembled the game andidentified major systems and components. They analyzed inputs and output signals to determine howthe game could be used for device control. A low cost housing was designed and built for the gamecomponents with integrated front panel switches and connectors for signal inputs and outputs.Prototyping breadboards were integrated into the housing to allow flexibility to build various signalconditioning circuits. Students were able to use the device to mentally create musical notes of variouspitches and use a frequency filter to create TTL signals for device control. Although the game can bechallenging to master, it serves as a low-cost and unique teaching tool to facilitate student interest forlearning about neural interface technology.

Campbell, B. R., & Pozzi, A. C. (2013, June), Work In Progress: Adapting Inexpensive Game Technology to Teach Principles of Neural Interface Technology and Device Control Paper presented at 2013 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Atlanta, Georgia. https://peer.asee.org/22761

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