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Work in Progress: Assessing Creativity of Alternative Uses Task Responses: A Detailed Procedure

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Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

Design Methodologies 2

Tagged Division

Design in Engineering Education

Page Count

15

DOI

10.18260/1-2--35612

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/35612

Download Count

57

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Paper Authors

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Amin G. Alhashim University of Oklahoma Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-4807-401X

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Amin G. Alhashim is a Ph.D. candidate at the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, The University of Oklahoma. Amin has a broad interest in human-computer interaction, data science, and engineering education. His ultimate goal is to leverage technology to invoke creativity in education and industry.

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Megan Marshall University of Oklahoma

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Megan Marshall is an M.S. Aerospace Engineering candidate at the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, The University of Oklahoma. Her research interests include the neuroscience of creativity and design, and using these insights to develop a person's creative and design ability.

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Tess Hartog University of Oklahoma

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Tess Hartog is a graduate student in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Oklahoma. She received her undergraduate degree in mathematics and psychology from the University of Oklahoma in 2019. Her interests include creativity, engineering education, and neuroimaging. Her research focuses on understanding creativity in engineering students via the use of electroencephalography (EEG).

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Rafal Jonczyk Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland, and Pennsylvania State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-2268-3792

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Rafał Jończyk (PhD) is an Assistant Professor of Linguistics at the Faculty of English of Adam Mickiewicz University in Poland. His main research interests concern the behavioural and neurocognitive correlates of emotion anticipation, perception, and production in the first (L1) and second (L2) language(s). His recent research interests include the investigation of brain dynamics during creative ideation and the extent to which creative ideation may be modulated by prior knowledge and training.

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Danielle Dickson Pennsylvania State University

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Dr. Dickson received a B.S. in Cognitive Science and a B.A. in Linguistics from UC San Diego in 2003. She earned a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2016 with a dissertation examining the memory system's representation of numerical information, using behavioral and electrophysiological (EEG, brainwaves) measures. She extended this work into comparisons of children and adults' arithmetic processing as a postdoctoral scholar at The University of Texas San Antonio. Presently, she is incorporating more flexible forms of creative thinking as an area of postdoctoral research at The Pennsylvania State University to contrast with more fact-based arithmetic numerical comprehension.

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Janet van Hell Pennsylvania State University

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Janet van Hell (PhD, University of Amsterdam) is Professor of Psychology and Linguistics and Co-Director of the Center for Language Science at the Pennsylvania State University. She is interested in the neural and cognitive mechanisms underlying language processing in monolingual and bilingual children and adults, including creative language use.

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Gül E. Okudan Kremer Iowa State University of Science and Technology

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Gül E. Kremer received her PhD from the Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering of Missouri University of Science & Technology. Her research interests include multi-criteria decision analysis methods applied to improvement of products and systems. She is a senior member of IIE, a fellow of ASME, a former Fulbright scholar and NRC Faculty Fellow. Her recent research focus includes sustainable product design and enhancing creativity in engineering design settings.

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Zahed Siddique University of Oklahoma

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Zahed Siddique is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering of University of Oklahoma. His research interest include product family design, advanced material and engineering education. He is interested in motivation of engineering students, peer-to-peer learning, flat learning environments, technology assisted engineering education and experiential learning. He is the coordinator of the industry sponsored capstone from at his school and is the advisor of OU's FSAE team.

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Abstract

Creativity is the driver of innovation in engineering. Hence, assessing the effectiveness of a curriculum, a method, or a technique in enhancing the creativity of engineering students is no doubt important. In this paper, the process involved in quantifying creativity when measured through the alternative uses task (AUT) is explained in detail. The AUT is a commonly used test for divergent thinking ability, which is a main aspect of creativity. Although it is commonly used, the processes used to score this task are far from standardized and tend to differ across studies. In this paper, we introduce these problems and move towards a standardized process by providing a detailed account of our quantification process. This quantification process takes into consideration four commonly used dimensions of creativity: originality, flexibility, fluency, and elaboration. AUT data from a preliminary case study were used to illustrate how the AUT and the quantification process can be used. The study was performed to understand the effect of the stereotype threat on the creativity of 25 female engineering students. The results indicate that after the stereotype threat intervention, participants generated more diverse and original ideas.

Alhashim, A. G., & Marshall, M., & Hartog, T., & Jonczyk, R., & Dickson, D., & van Hell, J., & Okudan Kremer, G. E., & Siddique, Z. (2020, June), Work in Progress: Assessing Creativity of Alternative Uses Task Responses: A Detailed Procedure Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--35612

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