Asee peer logo

Work in Progress: Creating Alternative Learning Strategies for Transfer Engineering Programs

Download Paper |

Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees’ Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

27

Page Numbers

26.1749.1 - 26.1749.27

DOI

10.18260/p.25085

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/25085

Download Count

117

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Amelito G Enriquez Canada College Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-1259-0680

visit author page

Amelito Enriquez is a professor of Engineering and Mathematics at Canada College in Redwood City, CA. He received a BS in Geodetic Engineering from the University of the Philippines, his MS in Geodetic Science from the Ohio State University, and his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Irvine. His research interests include technology-enhanced instruction and increasing the representation of female, minority and other underrepresented groups in mathematics, science and engineering.

visit author page

biography

Erik N Dunmire College of Marin

visit author page

Erik Dunmire is a professor of engineering and chemistry at College of Marin. He received his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from University of California, Davis. His research interests include broadening access to and improving success in lower-division STEM education.

visit author page

biography

Tom Rebold Monterey Peninsula College Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-4346-6938

visit author page

Tom Rebold has chaired the Engineering department at Monterey Peninsula College since 2004. He holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree in electrical engineering and computer science from MIT, and has been teaching online engineering classes since attending the Summer Engineering Teaching Institute at Cañada College in 2012.

visit author page

biography

Nicholas Langhoff Cañada College

visit author page

Nick Rentsch is an adjunct professor of physics, engineering, and computer science at Cañada College, Skyline College, and San Francisco State University. He received his M.S. degree from San Francisco State University in embedded electrical engineering and computer systems. His technical interests include embedded control, electronic hardware design, analog audio electronics, digital audio signal processing, and sound synthesis and electronics for musical applications. His educational research interests include technology-enhanced instruction and the development of novel instructional equipment and curricula for enhancing academic success in science and engineering.

visit author page

biography

Eva Schiorring EduData4Action

visit author page

Eva Schiorring has almost two decades of experience in research and evaluation and special knowledge about STEM education in community colleges and four-year institutions. Ms. Schiorring presently serves as the external evaluator for three NSF-funded projects that range in scope and focus from leadership development to service learning and experimentation with alternative delivery, including online lab courses. Ms. Schiorring is also evaluating a project that is part of the California State University system’s new initiative to increase first year persistence in STEM. In 2014, Ms. Schiorring was one of the first participants in the NSF’s Innovation-CORPS (I-CORPS), a two-month intensive training that uses an entrepreneurship model to teach participants to achieve scalable sustainability in NSF-funded projects. Past projects include evaluation of an NSF-funded project to improve advising for engineering students at a major state university in California. Ms. Schiorring is the author and co-author of numerous papers and served as project lead on a major study of transfer in engineering. Ms. Schiorring holds a Master’s Degree in Public Policy from Harvard University.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

Work in Progress: Creating Alternative Learning Strategies for Transfer Engineering ProgramsAbstractThe 2012 President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) report “Engageto Excel: Producing One Million Additional College Graduates with Degrees in Science,Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics” indicated that addressing the retention problem inthe first two years of college is the most promising and cost-effective strategy to produce theSTEM professionals needed in order to retain US historical preeminence in science andtechnology. The California Community College System, with its 112 community colleges and71off-campus centers enrolling approximately 2.3 million students (roughly a third of all UScommunity college students) is in a prime position to grow the future STEM workforce.However, in the face of shrinking resources and increasing costs and other barriers, an effectiveapproach is needed in order to capitalize on this opportunity. One prong in this approach is tomore fully exploit modern technological capabilities to reduce costs, broaden access, andimprove educational productivity. This paper presents preliminary results of a collaborativeproject, Creating Alternative Learning Strategies for Transfer Engineering Programs(CALSTEP), which aims to strengthen community college engineering programs using distanceeducation and other alternative delivery strategies that will enable small-to-medium communitycollege engineering programs to provide their students access to lower-division engineeringcourses needed to be competitive for transfer to four-year engineering programs. Funded by athree-year grant through the National Science Foundation Improving Undergraduate STEMEducation (NSF IUSE) program, CALSTEP will leverage existing educational resources anddevelop new ones for online lecture courses, as well as core engineering laboratory courses thatare delivered either completely online, or with limited face-to-face interactions. The initial areasof focus for laboratory course development are: Introduction to Engineering, EngineeringGraphics, Materials Science, and Circuit Analysis. CALSTEP will also develop alternativemodels of flipped classroom instruction to improve student success and enhance student accessto engineering courses that otherwise could not be supported in traditional delivery modes due tolow enrollment. The project will iteratively evaluate and refine the curriculum over the three-year grant period, as well as train other community college engineering faculty in the effectiveuse of the curriculum and resources developed.

Enriquez, A. G., & Dunmire, E. N., & Rebold, T., & Langhoff, N., & Schiorring, E. (2015, June), Work in Progress: Creating Alternative Learning Strategies for Transfer Engineering Programs Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.25085

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2015 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015