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Work in Progress: Improving Undergraduate Engineering Education Through Writing: Implementation in the Classroom Alongside a Hands-on Learning Pedagogy

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

Work-In-Progress Postcard Session

Tagged Division

Chemical Engineering

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/33629

Download Count

5

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Paper Authors

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Kitana M Kaiphanliam Washington State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-9799-0463

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Kitana Kaiphanliam is a first-year doctoral student in the Chemical Engineering program at Washington State University (WSU). Her research interests include biomanufacturing for immunotherapy applications and miniaturized hands-on learning devices for engineering education. Kitana is an active member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) at WSU, and serves as their Graduate Student Chair for the 2018-19 academic year.

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Olivia Reynolds Washington State University

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First year Chemical Engineering doctoral student pursuing research on the development and dissemination of low-cost, hands-on learning modules displaying heat and mass transfer concepts in a highly visual, interactive format. Graduated from Washington State University with a B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering in 2017. Currently also working towards completing an M.S. degree with work related to potentiometric biosensing.

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Jacqueline Burgher Gartner Campbell University

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Jacqueline Burgher Gartner is an Assistant Professor at Campbell University in the School of Engineering, which offers a broad BS in engineering with concentrations in chemical and mechanical engineering. Campbell University started the engineering program in 2016, and she is leading the design and implementation of the chemical engineering curriculum at Campbell's innovative, project based pedagogical approach. She has a PhD in chemical engineering from Washington State University, where she specialized in miniaturizing industrial systems for applications in the undergraduate engineering classroom.

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Olusola Adesope Washington State University

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Dr. Olusola O. Adesope is an Associate Professor of Educational Psychology and a Boeing Distinguished Professor of STEM Education at Washington State University, Pullman. His research is at the intersection of educational psychology, learning sciences, and instructional design and technology. His recent research focuses on the cognitive and pedagogical underpinnings of learning with computer-based multimedia resources; knowledge representation through interactive concept maps; meta-analysis of empirical research, and investigation of instructional principles and assessments in STEM. He is a Senior Associate Editor for the Journal of Engineering Education.

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Bernard J. Van Wie Washington State University

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Prof. Bernard J. Van Wie received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D., and did his postdoctoral work at the University of Oklahoma where he also taught as a visiting lecturer. He has been on the Washington State University (WSU) faculty for 36 years and for the past 22 years has focused on innovative pedagogy research as well as technical research in biotechnology. His 2007-2008 Fulbright exchange to Nigeria set the stage for him to receive the Marian Smith Award given annually to the most innovative teacher at WSU. He was also the recent recipient of the inaugural 2016 Innovation in Teaching Award given to one WSU faculty member per year.

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Abstract

As undergraduate engineering students graduate and advance in their careers, they are faced with multiple tasks that require them to write extensively, whether that be in industry or graduate school. Additionally, the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) lists the ability to communicate effectively an expected student outcome of accredited baccalaureate programs. Because of insufficient writing requirements in undergraduate engineering curricula, however, many engineers are unprepared for the writing-demand necessary to convey their own ideas or understanding of ideas. More rigorous writing practices would not only improve effective communication skills as undergraduate students pursue their education, but it can also help students develop a deeper conceptual foundation of engineering topics. The writing pedagogy of interest follows a scaffolded approach and will be implemented alongside a current hands-on learning pedagogy in a junior-level fluid mechanics class. Two theories build the foundation for this pedagogy: learning through mimicry and learning through instruction. The students begin by taking a pre-test with a descriptive paragraph of the technical phenomena occurring during use of a venturi meter; certain phrases of the paragraph are narrowed to two options, where they have to choose the correct phrase. Students then use the venturi hands-on learning device, followed by a posttest. In the posttest, the sections that were previously narrowed down to two options consist of blanks instead, where students are required to write their own comprehensible phrases. These initial steps will help students learn how to explain engineering concepts, leading them to being able to write full paragraphs describing this technical phenomenon on their own in an exam-setting. The results of this implementation will be compared to previous semesters when the scaffolded writing pedagogy was not used, acting as the control.

Kaiphanliam, K. M., & Reynolds, O., & Gartner, J. B., & Adesope, O., & Van Wie, B. J. (2019, June), Work in Progress: Improving Undergraduate Engineering Education Through Writing: Implementation in the Classroom Alongside a Hands-on Learning Pedagogy Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. https://peer.asee.org/33629

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