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Work in Progress: Kinesthetic Learning of Network Mechanics Using Force Feedback Technology

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Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

Work in Progress: Hands-on Activities

Tagged Division

Chemical Engineering

Page Count

7

DOI

10.18260/1-2--35666

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/35666

Download Count

81

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Paper Authors

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Ilhem F. Hakem Carnegie Mellon University

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Ilhem F. Hakem is the Director of Colloids, Polymers and Surfaces Minor Program and a Teaching Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA since 2018. Dr. Hakem received her Diplôme d’Etudes Supérieures and MS degree in Physics and PhD in Polymer Physics from the University of Abou Bekr Belkaïd, UABT (Tlemcen, Algeria). Dr. Hakem taught and supervised students as Professor at UABT until she joined the Department of Materials Science Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) as Visiting Professor in 2005.
Before joining CMU, Dr. Hakem made several short and long-term visits as a Visiting Professor at l’Institut Charles Sadron (Strasbourg, France), Max-Planck Institute for Polymer Research (Mainz, Germany) and Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, USA) where she worked on mean field theory applied to uncharged polymers and polyelectrolyte systems and small-angle neutron scattering of amphiphilic polymer systems in the presence of electrolytes, at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS).
Dr. Ilhem F. Hakem joined the Colloids, Polymers and Surfaces (CPS) Program and the Department of Chemical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University in 2018 as Teaching Professor to support and expand the educational activities of the CPS Program. This involves teaching of undergraduate and graduate level courses, supervising undergraduate and Master students in research projects related to soft materials and finally develop and get involved in K-12 outreach activities.

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Richard Tang Carnegie Mellon University

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Richard Tang is a student at Carnegie Mellon University, pursuing a BS degree in Materials Science and Engineering, graduating in May 2020.

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Michael R. Bockstaller Carnegie Mellon University

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Michael R. Bockstaller is Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his diploma in Chemistry from the Technical University of Karlsruhe (Germany) and his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the Johannes Gutenberg University (Mainz, Germany). He was scientific assistant at the Max-Planck Institute for Polymer Research (Mainz, Germany) and postdoctoral associate at the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He came to Carnegie Mellon from the Technical University of Aachen (Germany) where he held a Habilitation position. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and Emmy Noether grant recipient of the German Science Foundation.

Dr. Bockstaller's research interests involve polymer morphology, polymer-based nanostructures; polymer-based nanoparticle assemblies; phase behavior and structure-property relations of organic-inorganic heterogeneous materials; as well as characterization of materials using X-ray or neutron scattering and electron microscopy.

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Abstract

Recent advancements in haptic force feedback technologies enable novel opportunities for the teaching of science and engineering by augmenting classical laboratory experiments with haptic experiences that provide deeper insight into the connections between theory and experiment. This contribution describes the development and implementation of a ‘kinesthetic teaching toolkit’ for the particular purpose of teaching mechanical properties of polymer networks. In the first part the background of ‘network mechanics’ is introduced at a level consistent with undergraduate and graduate courses on Polymer Science and Engineering that are being offered at Carnegie Mellon University. The challenges associated with the design of hands-on experiences to support the teaching of ‘mechanical properties of polymer networks’ are described to illustrate the opportunities for force-feedback technologies. In the second part, this paper describes the process of adopting low-cost force feedback joysticks for the emulation of a ‘rubber extension’ experiment. The opportunities for students to explore material property changes in response to defined microstructural changes are described. Finally, we elaborate the implementation of the device in a laboratory course on Colloids, Polymers and Surface that is being offered at the Chemical Engineering Department at Carnegie Mellon University.

Hakem, I. F., & Tang, R., & Bockstaller, M. R. (2020, June), Work in Progress: Kinesthetic Learning of Network Mechanics Using Force Feedback Technology Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--35666

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