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Work In Progress: Teaching Wireless Sensor Networks Through Laboratory Experiments

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Conference

2010 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Louisville, Kentucky

Publication Date

June 20, 2010

Start Date

June 20, 2010

End Date

June 23, 2010

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

New Trends in ECE Education

Tagged Division

Electrical and Computer

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

15.1383.1 - 15.1383.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/17016

Download Count

35

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Paper Authors

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Paul Cotae University of the District of Columbia

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Esther Ososanya University of the District of Columbia

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Lily Kemathe University of the District of Columbia

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Lily Kemathe is a senior student in the Senior Design Class of the Spring of 2010 at the University of the District of Columbia

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Suresh Regmi University of the District of Columbia

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Suresh Regni is a senior student in the Digital Communication Class and the Senior Design Class of the Spring of 2010 at the University of the District of Columbia

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Kamden Patrice Kouam The University of the District of Columbia

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Kouam Kamden Patrice is a student in the Digital Communication Class and in the Senior Design Class of the Spring of 2010 at the University of the District of Columbia

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Work in Progress: Teaching Wireless Sensor Network Communication through Laboratory Experiments

Abstract

Wireless communications is becoming a transparent technology with which incoming college students most certainly have vast firsthand experience as users. Wireless Sensors Network Communications often proves to be a quite challenging subject to teach because many students appear to find the subject too technical. In this paper, we present some undergoing capstone design projects and laboratory experiments to provide the students of wireless communication and networking with a hands-on experience. The motivation of this approach is twofold. First, the projects pertain to the area of wireless sensor networks where rapid technological changes in wireless sensing devices have changed the types of work electrical and computer-engineering students are likely to do in their careers. Second, student groups come up with their own project applications and problem statements for which to design a system.

1. Introduction

The academic field is undergoing significant changes correspondent to the revolutionary advances in technology. Nowadays, more students have full time jobs or family obligations, which negatively affect on the frequency of student visits to the classes or labs. One of the enormous opportunities modern technologies provide lies in the effective use of computers and the Internet as potent educational tools. In the last few years, many universities have successfully used Internet based distance learning technologies.

This article discusses the possibility of teaching wireless sensor network communication through laboratory experiments. We focus on the following experiments: optimum placement of sensors in wireless sensor networks [3], [19], [21], sensor placement for effective diagnosis of multiple faults [5],[7],[8],[10], and continuous health monitoring using wearable biosensors [4]. For each project we presents the related work, how the proposed project is different, the requested equipment within the undergoing experiment and the anticipated results. We also focus the major educational activities [1], and provide the list of hands-on projects to be developed. We anticipate that the full project will be completed in the next 18 months.

2. Laboratory experiments

2.1 Optimum Placement of Sensors in Wireless Sensor Networks

Energy efficient system design in wireless sensor networks has become the top priority in order to provide the maximum possible lifetime of a given network [3]. Many communication, power management, and data dissemination protocols have been specifically designed for Wireless Sensor Networks where energy awareness is an essential design issue. Wireless communications between sensors requires more energy than the sensing and computational part of each node. As

Cotae, P., & Ososanya, E., & Kemathe, L., & Regmi, S., & Kouam, K. P. (2010, June), Work In Progress: Teaching Wireless Sensor Networks Through Laboratory Experiments Paper presented at 2010 Annual Conference & Exposition, Louisville, Kentucky. https://peer.asee.org/17016

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