Asee peer logo

Work in Progress: The Impacts of Scholarships on Engineering Students’ Motivation

Download Paper |

Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

ERM Technical Session 24: Studies on Socioeconomic Status

Tagged Division

Educational Research and Methods

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

6

DOI

10.18260/1-2--33654

Permanent URL

https://216.185.13.131/33654

Download Count

239

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Emily Bovee Michigan State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-1996-6337

visit author page

Emily A. Bovee is a doctoral candidate in Educational Psychology and Educational Technology at Michigan State University. Her current research is focused on understanding and supporting college student success, particularly in engineering disciplines.

visit author page

biography

Amalia Krystal Lira Michigan State University

visit author page

Amalia (Krystal) Lira is a doctoral student in Educational Psychology and Educational Technology at Michigan State University. She is interested in addressing STEM attrition among underrepresented racial and ethnic minority students using motivational frameworks.

visit author page

biography

Harrison Douglas Lawson Michigan State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-0946-2354

visit author page

I completed my undergraduate Chemical Engineering degree at the University of Pittsburgh. I am currently a graduate student at Michigan State University pursuing a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering. My research is biology and education focused. After graduating, I aspire to continue working with education programs and join a university as teaching faculty.

visit author page

biography

Daina Briedis Michigan State University

visit author page

DAINA BRIEDIS is a faculty member in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science at Michigan State University and Assistant Dean for Student Advancement and Program Assessment in the College of Engineering. Dr. Briedis is involved in research in the study of motivation in engineering students. She has been involved in NSF-funded research in the areas of integration of computation in engineering curricula and in developing comprehensive strategies to retain early engineering students. She is active nationally and internationally in engineering accreditation and is a Fellow of ABET, ASEE, and the AIChE.

visit author page

biography

Lisa Linnenbrink-Garcia Michigan State University

visit author page

Dr. Lisa Linnenbrink-Garcia is a professor of Educational Psychology in the Department of Counseling, Educational Psychology, and Special Education at Michigan State University. She received her Ph.D. in Education and Psychology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Her research focuses on the development of achievement motivation in educational settings and the interplay among motivation, emotions, and learning, especially in STEM fields.

visit author page

biography

S. Patrick Walton Michigan State University

visit author page

S. Patrick Walton received his B.ChE. from Georgia Tech, where he began his biomedical research career in the Cardiovascular Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. He then attended MIT where he earned his M.S. and Sc.D. while working jointly with researchers at the Shriners Burns Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital. While at MIT, he was awarded a Shell Foundation Fellowship and was an NIH biotechnology Predoctoral Trainee. Upon completion of his doctoral studies, he joined the Stanford University Genome Technology Center, receiving an NIH Kirschstein post-doctoral fellowship. He joined Michigan State University in 2004 and his research is focused on the development of parallel analytical methods and the engineering of active nucleic acids (e.g., siRNAs) through mechanism-based design. He has been recognized for his accomplishments in both teaching and research, receiving the MSU Teacher-Scholar award, the College of Engineering Withrow Teaching Excellence Award, and being named an MSU Lilly Teaching Fellow.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

WIP: The Impacts of Scholarships on Engineering Students’ Motivation

This work in progress paper will describe our initial efforts in examining how receiving a scholarship influences engineering students’ motivation. A student’s persistence and success in engineering depends on multiple academic, institutional, and personal factors. That said, no student can persist to graduation if they cannot pay their tuition. As such, financial need and socioeconomic status are a significant factors in determining the likelihood of a student graduating from an engineering program. Moreover, average student loan debt is increasing nationally, with engineering students often required to pay premium tuition, potentially leading to greater debt loads. A variety of programs, including federally-funded programs such as the NSF Scholarships in STEM (S-STEM) program, have sought to address these issues by providing scholarships to offset student expenses.

We hypothesize that the impacts of receiving a scholarship on the scholarship recipient may, however, go beyond simply alleviating financial stress or displacing the need to work or take out student loans. Indeed, we posit that by considering students’ motivation as measured at multiple intervals throughout college, researchers may be able to describe more fully the relation between scholarship receipt and persistence to graduation. Such an understanding would be beneficial for both faculty who work with engineering students and administrators who seek to support them. In this work, we are applying quantitative methods to assess the impacts of scholarships on the motivation of engineering students at a large, research-intensive university in the Midwest. Our research is examining three research questions:

RQ1) How do motivational characteristics (e.g., self-efficacy, interest in engineering) differ when comparing scholarship recipients and non-recipients? RQ2) Among scholarship recipients, what are the impacts of scholarship receipt on motivation? RQ3) What are the mechanisms by which scholarships influence students’ motivation?

Our approach will combine longitudinal data from biannual surveys of engineering students with registrar and financial aid data. With a sample size of 6,366 students, we anticipate being able to further classify students based on their anticipated financial need (High, Medium, Low, No), as determined by the financial aid office. In doing so, we hope to preliminarily assess whether the impacts of scholarships are different for merit-based awards (more likely among Low and No need students) and need-based awards (more likely among High and Medium need students). The current study will thus inform future programmatic and financial initiatives to support engineering student motivation and success.

Bovee, E., & Lira, A. K., & Lawson, H. D., & Briedis, D., & Linnenbrink-Garcia, L., & Walton, S. P. (2019, June), Work in Progress: The Impacts of Scholarships on Engineering Students’ Motivation Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. 10.18260/1-2--33654

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2019 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015