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Work‐in‐Progress: Using First‐Year Engineering Laboratory to Improve a Student’s Readiness to Pursue an Engineering Degree.

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Conference

2019 FYEE Conference

Location

Penn State University , Pennsylvania

Publication Date

July 28, 2019

Start Date

July 28, 2019

End Date

July 30, 2019

Conference Session

M1C: WIP - Readiness and Professional Development

Tagged Topic

FYEE Conference - Paper Submission

Page Count

4

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/33747

Download Count

55

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Paper Authors

biography

Reginald Perry Florida A&M University/Florida State University

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Dr. Reginald J. Perry is currently a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the joint Florida A&M University-Florida State University (FAMU-FSU) College of Engineering. He received the B.S. (Co-op, Highest Honors), M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering all from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He served as chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering from 1999 to 2004, and associate dean for student affairs and curriculum at the college from 2004 to 2018. Dr. Perry’s research interests include semiconductor device modeling, embedded systems design, and engineering education. He is an electrical and computer engineering program evaluator for ABET, Inc, a senior member of the IEEE, and a member of ASEE.

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Charmane Caldwell

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Dr. Charmane V. Caldwell is the Director of Student Access at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering (COE). As Director, Charmane leads a comprehensive effort to increase the number of underrepresented undergraduate minorities and women in engineering. She has developed and managed several retention programs at the college: Engineering Concepts Institute (ECI) Summer Bridge; Engineering Living Learning Community (LLC), Educating Engineering Students Innovatively (EESI) and Peer-Assisted Study Sessions (PASS). Dr. Caldwell also serves as the activity director for the Title III program Engineering Learning Community. Those collective programs have nearly doubled the first-year retention of underrepresented minorities at the college. Additionally, Dr. Caldwell serves as a teaching professor for the First-Year Engineering Lab (FYEL), which is part of the pre-engineering program.

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Melodee M Moore Florida A&M University-Florida State University

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Dr. Melodee Moore received her Bachelor of Science degree in Chemical Engineering from Howard University, and her PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Northwestern University. She has been an instructor at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering since 2005, where she teaches First Year Engineering Laboratory and other general engineering courses. Her research efforts focus primarily on engineering education.

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Kenneth Tellis Florida A&M University/Florida State University

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Ken Tellis is a doctoral candidate in the College of Education at Florida A&M University

His research topic of interest is retention among underrepresented minority students in engineering education.

Ken's professional background is in college admissions and recruitment.

He is actively involved in professional and civic organizations and enjoys reading, travel, and general aviation.

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Abstract

Work in Progress: First‐Year Engineering Laboratory (FYEL) is a course usually taken by freshman engineering students during one semester of their first year at the FAMU‐FSU College of Engineering. The course is designed to meet three primary objectives: (1) inspire students by reinforcing their desire to pursue engineering as a professional career, (2) orient students to the university environment by presenting information designed to ease their transition from high school, and (3) introduce students to a set of technical and social skills which are needed to complete an engineering degree program. Although the technical content of our course is not overly difficult, we still find that some students are unable to complete it with a satisfactory grade. This is troubling since we have previously reported that good performance in this course correlated well to degree completion in engineering. Academic preparedness as measured by high school grade point average and college placement test scores are some obvious factors to consider. However, others may also be just as important. These may include the high school a student attended, a student’s access to technology, and the intrinsic motivation or mindset of a student. This work‐in‐progress will report on some of our findings as we examine the firstyear students who completed the course during a fall semester between 2013 and 2017. We especially look at the performance of these students on the FYEL midterm. This is a multiple choice test which is worth 20% of a student’s overall grade and is normally given around week 8 or 9 in the semester. We are using Bloom’s Taxonomy to classify each question to determine if a relationship exists between the type of questions which separate the top students from those in the bottom quartile. We also examine factors such as race/ethnicity, gender, instructional method, and course instructor. With these results, it may be possible to develop specific interventions to assist students in closing the preparation gap thus improving their likelihood of completing an engineering degree program.

Perry, R., & Caldwell, C., & Moore, M. M., & Tellis, K. (2019, July), Work‐in‐Progress: Using First‐Year Engineering Laboratory to Improve a Student’s Readiness to Pursue an Engineering Degree. Paper presented at 2019 FYEE Conference , Penn State University , Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/33747

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