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3D Printing of Short-Fiber Composites as an Effective Tool for Undergraduate Education in Composite Materials

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Conference

2017 Pacific Southwest Section Meeting

Location

Tempe, Arizona

Publication Date

April 20, 2017

Start Date

April 20, 2017

End Date

April 22, 2017

Conference Session

Technical Session 3d

Tagged Topic

Pacific Southwest Section

Page Count

15

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/29199

Download Count

35

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Paper Authors

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Kwok Siong Teh San Francisco State University

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Kwok Siong Teh received his B.S., M.S., Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and University of California at Berkeley in 1997, 2001, and 2004, respectively. He is currently an associate professor of mechanical engineering, as well as the Associate Director of the School of Engineering at San Francisco State University. His primary research interests are in the direct synthesis, characterization, and applications of nanocomposites and nanostructures for energy generation and storage.

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Gilbert Ramirez Cañada College

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Gilbert Ramirez is a Bay Area resident who is originally from Southern California. Gilbert is currently studying Mechanical Engineering and has 15 years experience in the mechanical trade. He will be attending Santa Clara University this Spring and his goal is to teach engineering after graduation. In his free time, Gilbert enjoys spending time with his three children and training for triathlons.

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Javier Robert Piccolotti

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Amelito G Enriquez Canada College

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Amelito Enriquez is a professor of Engineering and Mathematics at Cañada College in Redwood City, CA. He received a BS in Geodetic Engineering from the University of the Philippines, his MS in Geodetic Science from the Ohio State University, and his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Irvine. His research interests include technology-enhanced instruction and increasing the representation of female, minority and other underrepresented groups in mathematics, science and engineering.

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Wenshen Pong P.E. San Francisco State University

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Wenshen Pong received his Ph.D. in Structural Engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He joined the School of Engineering at San Francisco State University in 1998. He teaches courses in Civil/Structural Engineering.

Dr. Pong is a registered Professional Engineer in California. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Structural Engineers Association of California. He has published over fifty technical papers in the areas of Structural Control and Earthquake Engineering. Dr. Pong has been the Director of the School of Engineering at SFSU with 20 full-time faculty and over 25 part-time faculty since 2009.

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Hamid Mahmoodi San Francisco State University

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Hamid Mahmoodi received his Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering from Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, in 2005. He is currently a professor of electrical and computer engineering in the School of Engineering at San Francisco State University. His research interests include low-power, reliable, and high-performance circuit design in nano-electronic technologies. He has published more than one hundred technical papers in journals and conferences and holds five U.S. patents. He was a co-recipient of the 2008 SRC Inventor Recognition Award, the 2006 IEEE Circuits and Systems Society VLSI Transactions Best Paper Award, 2005 SRC Technical Excellence Award, and the Best Paper Award of the 2004 International Conference on Computer Design. He has served on technical program committees of Custom Integrated Circuits Conference, International Symposium on Low Power Electronics Design, and International Symposium on Quality Electronics Design.

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Zhaoshuo Jiang P.E. San Francisco State University

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Prof. Jiang graduated from the University of Connecticut with a Ph.D. degree in Civil Engineering. Before joining San Francisco State University as an assistant professor, he worked for Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) LLP. As a licensed professional engineer in the states of Connecticut and California, Dr. Jiang has been involved in the design of a variety of low-rise and high-rise projects. His current research interests mainly focus on Smart Structures Technology, Structural Control and Health Monitoring and Innovative Engineering Education.

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Cheng Chen San Francisco State University

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Dr. Cheng Chen is currently an associate professor in the school of engineering at San Francisco State University. His research interests include earthquake engineering, structural reliability and fire structural engineering.

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Xiaorong Zhang San Francisco State University

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Xiaorong Zhang received the B.S. degree in computer science from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China, in 2006, the M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees in computer engineering from University of Rhode Island, Kingston, in 2009 and 2013 respectively. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the School of Engineering at San Francisco State University. Her research interests include embedded systems, wearable technologies, neural-machine interface, and cyber-physical systems.

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Tim L Mitchell Jr

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Matthew Ward Carlson Cañada College

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Matthew Carlson is a sophomore at Cañada College in Redwood City, CA, who is studying mechanical engineering. His research interests include 3D-printing and aerospace engineering, and hopes to pursue an engineering career after attaining a bachelors degree.

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Shane Sharp San Jose State University

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Shane Sharp is a junior at San Jose State University, CA, majoring in mechanical engineering. His research interests include automotive material design, and he hopes to pursue a career in automotive safety systems.

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Jesus Alexis Caballero Cañada College

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Jesus A. Caballero is a third year student at Canada College in Redwood City, CA. He is currently studying Mechanical Engineering. Jesus is interested in further researching 3 Dimensional printing and mechatronics, and hopes to work in an Electronics Industry.

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Abstract

Fiber-reinforced composite materials enjoy widespread uses as structural materials in myriad of modern-day applications including airframes, high-performance vehicles, consumer sports equipment, biomedical prosthetics, and building construction. Despite years of fruitful progress in the materials aspect of composite materials, the still-heavy reliance on manual fabrication and the lack of automated composite-making techniques have kept composite materials from being a high-volume production materials-of-choice and from being easily made into complex shapes with consistent quality. To this end, three-dimensional printing of composite materials—a nascent and potentially game-changing composite manufacturing technology in its own right—offers an enabling technological solutions. The work presented here details a collaborative research effort between students and faculty of Canada College (Redwood City, CA) and San Francisco State University (SFSU, San Francisco, CA), supported by a Department of Education grant, in realizing 3D printing of short-fiber UV-curable polymer composite. Four Canada College students working alongside an SFSU student mentor, successfully designed, prototyped and commissioned an innovative extrusion mechanism capable of printing short-fiber infused polymer composites, at a single-line resolution of 0.5mm and in a consistent layer-by-layer fashion. The extrusion mechanism is capable of extruding UV-sensitive polymer that incorporates carbon fibers (7µm diameter, up to 0.1g) and cloisites nanoclay (up to 0.075g) per 1mL of the UV curable polymer, VorexTM. Various composite test specimens were printed for mechanical testing and for characterization using a scanning electron microscope. Results arising from this research point to: (i) mechanically robust short-fiber composites that are capable of being produced by direct 3D printing, and (ii) a remarkable dispersion of short carbon fibers in the polymer matrix, which displays relatively defect-free interfacial bonding. Through a 10-week theoretically grounded, hands on undergraduate research experience, the community college students were able to deepen their understanding of the mechanics and manufacturing of composite materials, starting from scratch and against a steep learning curve, via meaningful experimentations, relentless trouble-shooting, and constant consultation with suppliers and industry experts.

Teh, K. S., & Ramirez, G., & Piccolotti, J. R., & Enriquez, A. G., & Pong, W., & Mahmoodi, H., & Jiang, Z., & Chen, C., & Zhang, X., & Mitchell, T. L., & Carlson, M. W., & Sharp, S., & Caballero, J. A. (2017, April), 3D Printing of Short-Fiber Composites as an Effective Tool for Undergraduate Education in Composite Materials Paper presented at 2017 Pacific Southwest Section Meeting, Tempe, Arizona. https://peer.asee.org/29199

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