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A Corporate Organizational Model for Scaling Class Size

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Conference

2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 23, 2018

Start Date

June 23, 2018

End Date

July 27, 2018

Conference Session

Scaling class size and technology – New Engineering Educators Division

Tagged Division

New Engineering Educators

Page Count

15

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/29669

Download Count

102

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Paper Authors

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Geoffrey Recktenwald Michigan State University

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Dr. Recktenwald is a lecturer in Mechanical Engineering at Michigan State University where he teaches courses in in mechanics and mathematical methods. He completed his degree in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics at Cornell University in stability and parametric excitation. His active areas of research are dynamic stability, online assessment, and instructional pedagogy.

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Allison Godwin Purdue University-Main Campus, West Lafayette (College of Engineering) Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-0741-3356

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Allison Godwin, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Engineering Education at Purdue University. Her research focuses what factors influence diverse students to choose engineering and stay in engineering through their careers and how different experiences within the practice and culture of engineering foster or hinder belongingness and identity development. Dr. Godwin graduated from Clemson University with a B.S. in Chemical Engineering and Ph.D. in Engineering and Science Education. Her research earned her a National Science Foundation CAREER Award focused on characterizing latent diversity, which includes diverse attitudes, mindsets, and approaches to learning, to understand engineering students’ identity development. She is the recipient of a 2014 American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Educational Research and Methods Division Apprentice Faculty Grant. She has also been recognized for the synergy of research and teaching as an invited participant of the 2016 National Academy of Engineering Frontiers of Engineering Education Symposium and 2016 New Faculty Fellow for the Frontiers in Engineering Education Annual Conference. She also was an NSF Graduate Research Fellow for her work on female empowerment in engineering which won the National Association for Research in Science Teaching 2015 Outstanding Doctoral Research Award.

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Anant Sahai University of California, Berkeley

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Anant Sahai got his BS degree in EECS from Berkeley in '94 and then got his MS and PhD degrees from MIT in '96 and '01. Before joining Berkeley as a faculty member in '02, he spent a year at the wireless startup Enuvis working on ultra-sensitive software-radio algorithms for GPS. His current research interests are in the foundations of information theory for control, low-latency wireless communication protocols to support the high performance Active IoT applications of the future, and wireless spectrum sharing (where his interests span machine learning, system architectures, game theory, law, and policy). In 2015-2016, he co-taught and scaled-up a radically new "introduction to EECS" course that is required for Berkeley EECS Freshmen and introduces them to circuits and systems concepts while teaching them linear algebra, all while doing interesting labs and application-oriented problems. In 2013 and 2014, he was also instrumental in helping scale up the sophomore discrete math and probability course to 500+ students. In 2017-2018, he is bringing this philosophy to the flagship machine learning course for EECS.

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Matthew West University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

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Matthew West is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Prior to joining Illinois he was on the faculties of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University and the Department of Mathematics at the University of California, Davis. Prof. West holds a Ph.D. in Control and Dynamical Systems from the California Institute of Technology and a B.Sc. in Pure and Applied Mathematics from the University of Western Australia. His research is in the field of scientific computing and numerical analysis, where he works on computational algorithms for simulating complex stochastic systems such as atmospheric aerosols and feedback control. Prof. West is the recipient of the NSF CAREER award and is a University of Illinois Distinguished Teacher-Scholar and College of Engineering Education Innovation Fellow.

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Abstract

Many institutions are facing increasing enrollment in engineering and growing class sizes. This shift puts a strain on course management, resources, and quality student learning. Each institution of higher education has a different approach to dealing with large enrollments and the process for scaling a successful course will be different at each institution. Scaling approaches range from building MOOCs, to simply cloning courses, and to more complicated hierarchies of teaching assistants, instructors, and course coordinators. While the actualization of these approaches will differ by institution and are shaped by institutional needs and resources, there are a small set of basic course models that are utilized. Each of these models has benefits and challenges specific to its structure and will be common across institutions. In this paper we utilize a corporate development model to discuss the benefits and challenges faced by each of different scaling models. The goal is to build a framework and common language by which faculty from different institutions can dialog about their challenges and successes and build on the lessons learned from other institutions. This paper was developed by a workgroup at the 2016 National Academies of Engineering Frontiers of Engineering Education workshop. The goal of this paper is to open a dialog of how to continue to have rich and inclusive undergraduate engineering education at larger and larger classroom scale. We believe that this is an important and pragmatic conversation for many faculty in improving undergraduate teaching.

Recktenwald, G., & Godwin, A., & Sahai, A., & West, M. (2018, June), A Corporate Organizational Model for Scaling Class Size Paper presented at 2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/29669

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