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A Lab-Scale Autonomous Haul Truck for Underground Mine Operations: Design and Development

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Conference

2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

New Orleans, Louisiana

Publication Date

June 26, 2016

Start Date

June 26, 2016

End Date

August 28, 2016

ISBN

978-0-692-68565-5

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Capstone and Design Projects

Tagged Division

Engineering Technology

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

13

DOI

10.18260/p.26337

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/26337

Download Count

73

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Paper Authors

biography

Loryn R. Becker Michigan Technological University

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Loryn Becker is currently pursuing his B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering Technology at Michigan Technological University (MTU), Houghton, Michigan. His was previously affiliated with the Northcentral Technical College (NTC), Wausau, Wisconsin, where he received an A.S degree in Electromechanical Engineering Technology and a certificate in Mechanical Equipment Maintenance. His work experience includes several lab assistant positions at MTU and NTC, and an internship position at Oldenburg Group Incorporated, Kingsford, Michigan. Loryn's current academic interests include robotics, digital logic, digital circuitry, and programming with high level languages.

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Ted J. Wierzba Michigan Technological University

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Ted Wierzba is currently pursuing a Bachelor's degree in the Electrical Engineering Technology program at Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan. He has an Associate's degree in Electromechanical Engineering Technology and a certificate in Mechanical Electronic Maintenance from Northcentral Technical College, Wausau, Wisconsin. His academic interests include programming, controls, and automation.

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Mohsen Azizi Michigan Technological University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-8178-2520

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Mohsen Azizi received the Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering from Concordia University, Montreal, Canada, in 2010. From 2010 to 2013, he was a R&D engineer at Pratt & Whitney Canada Inc. and Aviya Tech Inc., Longueuil, Canada. Since 2012 he has been an adjunct assistant professor in electrical and computer engineering at Concordia University. In 2013 he joined Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan, where he is currently an assistant professor in electrical engineering technology. His research interests include cooperative control and networked estimation in multi-agent systems, distributed and decentralized control of large-scale systems, and fault diagnosis, isolation and recovery (FDIR). He is specifically interested in the application of control systems and diagnostics in jet engines, unmanned vehicles, aircraft, and power systems. Dr. Azizi was the recipient of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Postgraduate Scholarship Doctoral 2007-2010, and Fonds québécois de la recherche sur la nature et les technologies (FQRNT) Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Government of Quebec 2011-2012.

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Aleksandr Sergeyev Michigan Technological University

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Aleksandr Sergeyev is currently an Associate
Professor in the Electrical Engineering
Technology program in the
School of Technology at Michigan Technological
University. Dr. Aleksandr
Sergeyev earned his bachelor degree in
Electrical Engineering at Moscow University
of Electronics and Automation in
1995. He obtained the Master degree
in Physics from Michigan Technological
University in 2004 and the PhD degree in Electrical Engineering
from Michigan Technological University in 2007.
Dr. Aleksandr Sergeyev’s research interests include high
energy laser propagation through the turbulent atmosphere,
developing advanced control algorithms for wavefront sensing
and mitigating effects of the turbulent atmosphere, digital
inline holography, digital signal processing, and laser spectroscopy. Dr. Sergeyev is a member of ASEE, IEEE, SPIE and is actively involved in promoting engineering education.

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Ebrahim Tarshizi Michigan Technological University

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Dr. Ebrahim Tarshizi is an assistant professor of mining engineering at Michigan Technological University's Department of Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences. Ebrahim received a Ph.D. degree in Geo-Engineering/Mining Engineering from the Mackay School of Earth Sciences & Engineering at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). He also received an MSc in Mining Engineering with a graduate minor in Business Administration from UNR, and an M.B.A. from the UNR College of Business. He earned his bachelor’s degree in Mining-Exploration Engineering in 2004 in Iran. Ebrahim is currently pursuing a new M.Sc. degree in Data Science, an interdisciplinary program at Michigan Tech.

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Laura Claire O'Connor Michigan Technological University

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Laura is a Geological Engineering student at Michigan Technological University, graduating with her B.S. in Spring 2016. She has worked and conducted research within the mining industry throughout her undergraduate career and will be attending graduate school for Mining Engineering in Fall 2016.

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Ryan J. Livernois Michigan Technological University

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I am a Undergraduate geology student at Michigan Tech graduating in December 2016. I have field experience with geological mapping, surveying, and conducting various geophysical surveys. With data collected in the field I can utilize Surfer 9 and GM-SYS to map the subsurface, as well as using Maptek's Vulcan mine software to develop and visualize ore bodies in the subsurface. After graduating with my Bachelors degree, I am looking to forward my education and receive my Masters degree in geology.

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Abstract

Mines are one of the most labor-intensive industries, and automation in this industry has been significantly considered to create mining sustainability and enhance the utilization of heavy and expensive equipment. Due to the more complex nature and larger scale of underground mines in recent years, companies are actively looking for new automation methods, particularly in haul trucks to effectively improve productivity, and health and safety in the mining environment.

In this research, a lab-scale autonomous underground haul truck is designed and developed for underground mines. This autonomous haul truck is capable of finding its path along an underground tunnel in the presence of obstacles. The impact of the developed autonomous truck in the haulage operation of a virtual underground mine is assessed, and its cycle time improvement is analyzed, using the discrete-event system simulation and animation technique. The simulation includes the animation of the haulage operation, which is helpful to enhance the benefit of a simulation model. GPSS/H® and PROOF Animation Professional® software packages are used for this investigation.

The autonomous haul truck is designed and developed to represent a hypothetical haulage operation in this project. It is capable of finding its path along the tunnel without colliding with the walls or any obstacles on the way. The haul truck is equipped with several sensors of various types, which provide different characteristics and capabilities for navigation and collision avoidance. Three modes of operation are considered for the haul truck: manual, test, and autonomous modes. In the manual mode, the haul truck is driven manually using a remote control device provided by the manufacturer. In the test mode, a data acquisition (DAQ) board sends the sensor signals to the computer, in which a LabVIEW® program processes sensor signals and sends control commands to the haul truck. In this mode, the computer is used to implement, fine tune, and optimize the signal processing and control algorithms. In the autonomous mode, the microcontroller installed on the haul truck is used to implement the optimized (signal processing and control) algorithms, which makes the haul truck autonomous and independent from the computer.

In this paper, the technical aspects of the design and development of the autonomous haul truck will be presented. Moreover, the benefits of the autonomous mode of operation as compared to the manual mode will be quantified by using the discrete-event system simulation and animation technique. This research and development project is conducted collaboratively by the School of Technology and the Department of Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences at Michigan Technological University. It provides several graduate and undergraduate students from both departments with the opportunity to learn and practice team work and collaborative research in a multidisciplinary environment.

Becker, L. R., & Wierzba, T. J., & Azizi, M., & Sergeyev, A., & Tarshizi, E., & O'Connor, L. C., & Livernois, R. J. (2016, June), A Lab-Scale Autonomous Haul Truck for Underground Mine Operations: Design and Development Paper presented at 2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, New Orleans, Louisiana. 10.18260/p.26337

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