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A Nationwide Effort to Improve Transportation Engineering Education

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Conference

2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Vancouver, BC

Publication Date

June 26, 2011

Start Date

June 26, 2011

End Date

June 29, 2011

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Attracting and Retaining Students in Civil Engineering

Tagged Division

Civil Engineering

Page Count

14

Page Numbers

22.75.1 - 22.75.14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/17357

Download Count

29

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Paper Authors

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Rhonda K. Young University of Wyoming

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Rhonda Young is an associate professor in the Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering at the University of Wyoming specializing in the transportation field. Rhonda is a registered professional engineering and has been in academics for nine years after working as a transportation consultant for over ten years. Within transportation her focus areas are transportation planning and rural intelligent transportation systems.

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Kristen L. Sanford Bernhardt P.E. Lafayette College

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Steven W. Beyerlein University of Idaho, Moscow

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Dr. Beyerlein is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Idaho where he has taught since 1987. He is college coordinator of the inter-disciplinary senior design program and is an active participant in research activities within the National Institute for Advanced Transportation Technology. He has published numerous articles on curriculum design and facilitation of active learning, assessment of professional skills within project courses, and knowledge management involving engineering software tools.

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Andrea Bill University of Madison, Wisconsin

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Michael Kyte University of Idaho, Moscow

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Kevin Heaslip Utah State University

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Kevin Heaslip is an assistant professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering specializing in Transportation Engineering. He received his Ph.D. from University of Massachusetts, Amherst in 2007. Prior to that, he received his Master’s and Bachelor's Degrees in Civil Engineering from Virginia Tech. His research interests include sustainable and resilient transportation infrastructures, traffic operations, transit operations, and intelligent transportation systems. In addition, his research involves design and operations of work zones on freeways and arterials in addition to the driver’s response to those design elements. He is involved actively at the national level with the Institute of Transportation Engineers, the Intelligent Transportation Society of America’s Research, Integration, Training, and Education forum, and several committees of the Transportation Research Board.

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David S. Hurwitz Oregon State University

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Dr. Hurwitz serves as an Assistant Professor in the School of Civil and Construction Engineering at Oregon State University (OSU). He teaches graduate and undergraduate classes in traffic operations, highway design, traffic signal design, and transportation safety. His areas of research interest include traffic engineering, driver behavior, driving simulation, and human factors. Dr. Hurwitz founded a traffic data collection company in Massachusetts that successfully completed numerous projects with private companies and public agencies during his 5 year tenure with the firm. He is an active member of TRB, ASCE, and ITE.

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Shashi S. Nambisan Iowa State University

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Shashi Nambisan, Ph.D., P.E., is Director of the Institute for Transportation and Professor of Civil Engineering at Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa. He enjoys working with students and he has taught undergraduate and graduate courses in the area of Transportation systems as well as undergraduate capstone design courses. Dr. Nambisan has led efforts on over 150 research projects. He has taught over a dozen undergraduate and graduate courses in various areas related to transportation systems as well as undergraduate capstone design courses. He also has been very active in leadership roles of several professional societies. Among the awards and honors Shashi has received is a proclamation by the Governor of Nevada designating January 31, 2007 as “Professor Shashi Nambisan Day” in recognition of his leadership role in and contributions to enhancing transportation safety.

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Abstract

A Nationwide Effort to Improve Transportation Engineering EducationOver the last year and a half, a group of transportation engineering educators has worked todevelop a set of core concepts and learning outcomes for a typical introductory transportationengineering course. To date, the group has developed knowledge tables for the core conceptsassociated with traffic operations, transportation planning, geometric design, transportationfinance, transportation economics, traffic safety, transit, non-motorized transport, and humanfactors. Further, the group has identified five ways of being (that is, sets of behaviors, actions,and language) that, together with the core concepts, form the foundation for 13 course-levellearning outcomes.The 20 members of the working group, which has become a subcommittee of the Institute ofTransportation Engineers Education Council, represent 13 different colleges and universitiesthroughout the United States. The development process has consisted of regular conference callspunctuated by a series of face-to-face meetings. A critical element of success is broadeningstakeholder involvement. To this end, the group presented its work to date at the AnnualMeeting of the Transportation Research Board in January, 2010 and at the 2010 ASEE AnnualConference. In August, 2010 the group held a workshop and conversation circle at the ITEMeeting with the specific goal of involving practicing engineers in the process.This paper briefly describes the history of this effort. It presents examples of the work to dateand discusses the outcomes of the practitioner involvement. The work and feedback have beenincorporated into a pilot course being taught in Fall 2010; the paper describes the adaptation andassessment, including lessons learned for a second pilot implementation in 2011. Finally, thenext steps in this effort, including further development and assessment, are explored.

Young, R. K., & Sanford Bernhardt, K. L., & Beyerlein, S. W., & Bill, A., & Kyte, M., & Heaslip, K., & Hurwitz, D. S., & Nambisan, S. S. (2011, June), A Nationwide Effort to Improve Transportation Engineering Education Paper presented at 2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Vancouver, BC. https://peer.asee.org/17357

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