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A Seven-week Module to Introduce Electrical and Computer Engineering to Freshmen Engineering Students

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

First-Year Programs: Monday Cornucopia (Classroom Innovations)

Tagged Division

First-Year Programs

Page Count

13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/31993

Download Count

7

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Paper Authors

biography

Kala Meah York College of Pennsylvania

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Kala Meah received the B.Sc. degree from Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology in 1998, the M.Sc. degree from South Dakota State University in 2003, and the Ph.D. degree from the University of Wyoming in 2007, all in Electrical Engineering. From 1998 to 2000, he worked for several power companies in Bangladesh. Currently, Dr. Meah is an Associate Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering program, Department of Engineering and Computer Science, York College of Pennsylvania, York, PA, USA. His research interest includes electrical power, HVDC transmission, renewable energy applications, energy conversion, and engineering education.

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James Moscola York College of Pennsylvania

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James Moscola is an Associate Professor of Computer Science and Computer Engineering at York College of Pennsylvania. He received a B.S. in Physical Science from Muhlenberg College in 2000, a B.S. in Computer Engineering, a M.S. in Computer Science, and a Ph.D. in Computer Engineering from Washington University in St. Louis in 2001, 2003, and 2008 respectively. His interests include reconfigurable architectures and embedded systems.

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James A. Kearns York College of Pennsylvania

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Jim Kearns is an Associate Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering at York College of Pennsylvania. He received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering (SEAS) and a B.S. in Economics (Wharton) from the University of Pennsylvania in 1982. Subsequently, he received his M.E. from Carnegie-Mellon University in 1984, and his Ph.D. from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1990, both in Mechanical Engineering. While at Georgia Tech he was the recipient of a Presidential Fellowship. Subsequently, he worked as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Applied Research Laboratory of the University of Texas-Austin. Dr. Kearns has spent the past 22 years at York College of Pennsylvania developing new programs in mechanical, electrical, and computer engineering. In 2016 he co-authored the 6th edition of Principles and Applications of Electrical Engineering with Dr. Giorgio Rizzoni of the Ohio State University.

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Eleanor Leung York College of Pennsylvania

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Dr. Eleanor Leung is an assistant professor with the Electrical and Computer Engineering program of York College of Pennsylvania. Her research area is in wireless communications focusing on space-time block coding and the design of signal constellations. Her technical research area is in wireless communications focusing on space-time block coding and the design of signal constellations. She is also doing research work focused on active and collaborative learning in engineering education. Eleanor has a B.S in Electrical Engineering from the University of Calgary and both a M.Eng and a Ph.D in Electrical Engineering from McMaster University.

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Jason Forsyth James Madison University

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Jason Forsyth is an Assistant Professor of Engineering at James Madison University. He received his PhD from Virginia Tech in May 2015. His major research interests are in wearable/ubiquitous computing and engineering education.

His wearable computing work develops safety systems that provide continuous monitoring and sensing to protect human life. Previous work examined the role of wearable pulse oximetry in protecting construction workers from carbon monoxide poisoning and developing a warning system for road-side workers and emergency personnel to estimate potential vehicle strikes. His current research interests focus on on-body human activity recognition and interactive machine learning for physical therapy patients and practitioners to increase exercise adherence and clinical evaluation.

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Abstract

Engineering students at ------------------- have a common first semester, where they all take a design based engineering course along with other common courses. This design course consists of two modules: an Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) module; and a Mechanical and Civil Engineering (MCE) module. Students spend seven weeks working on each module, exploring basic concepts in each discipline. In the MCE module, students work with Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools, basic hand tools, and machine tools in a machine shop. In the ECE module, students develop basic skills working with electrical/electronic devices, sensors, actuator, and programming. The seven week ECE module is divided into the following units: introduction to electrical terminologies, basic electrical test equipment, testing, and plotting motor data; switches, crimping, and soldering; operational amplifiers and potentiometers; Arduino microcontrollers and basic programming; gate drivers, infrared sensors, and autonomous navigation. To explore these topics, the ECE module utilizes a custom robotic platform, called the Ebot. This platform is equipped with dual onboard power supplies, motors, and a small breadboard. Students use the Ebot platform to build and test a variety of electrical circuits throughout the different units.

This introductory design course emphasizes the following: ● familiarizing freshman engineering students with what it means to be an engineer and how engineers think; ● developing a sense of teamwork and building student confidence; ● exposing students to the creative art of design early in the engineering curriculum; ● developing basic skills in the use of computers, electronic devices, sensors, CAD, hand tools, and machine tools; ● retaining students who possess the interest and ability to succeed in engineering by providing interesting design projects and fun competitions; ● improving the oral and pictorial communication skills of students.

This paper provides a detailed description of the course organization and administration, and assessment of the course outcomes for the ECE module.

Meah, K., & Moscola, J., & Kearns, J. A., & Leung, E., & Forsyth, J. (2019, June), A Seven-week Module to Introduce Electrical and Computer Engineering to Freshmen Engineering Students Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. https://peer.asee.org/31993

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