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A Web Based Bayesian Van Hiele Problem Solver For Computer Programming

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Collection

2010 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Louisville, Kentucky

Publication Date

June 20, 2010

Start Date

June 20, 2010

End Date

June 23, 2010

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Emerging Information Technologies

Tagged Division

Information Systems

Page Count

17

Page Numbers

15.112.1 - 15.112.17

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/16631

Download Count

29

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Paper Authors

biography

J. Wey Chen Southern Taiwan University

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Dr. J. Wey Chen is a Visiting Professor in the Department of Information System at Southern Taiwan University. He formerly served a two-year appointment (2007-2009) as the Department Chair of the Department of Information Management at Southern Taiwan University and was the Computer Science Department Chair at Western State College of Colorado. His scholarly interests range widely, from computer science curriculum design to e-learning and software engineering practices.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

A Web-based Bayesian van Hiele Problem Solver for Computer Programming

Abstract

Computer programming teaching is often based upon the traditional lecture format. However, this methodology may not be the best way to help many students actively understand underlying concepts. This paper formulates an alternative pedagogical approach that encompasses the van Hiele Model, cognitive model, and Bayesian network to design a web-based intelligent van Hiele Problem Solver (IVHPS). The system takes full advantage of Bayesian networks (BNs), which are a formal framework for uncertainty management to provide intelligent navigation support, and to make individualized diagnosis of student solutions in learning computer programming. In addition, we describe the architecture of the system and the roles of seven modules contained in the system. They are all integrated into the environment to increase student satisfaction and achievement by stimulating student motivation and encouraging the perception of problem solving and programming concepts.

Introduction

"Programming" is a complicated business. For many of the students who take programming courses, programming is a scary new subject. In his classic article on teaching programming Dijkstra1 argues that learning to program is a slow and gradual process of transforming the "novel into the familiar".

Most computing educators also find that programming is not a single skill. It is not a simple set of discrete skills; the skills form a hierarchy2, and a programmer will be using many of them at any point in time. A student faced with learning a hierarchy of skills will generally learn the lower level skills first, and will then progress upwards3. In the case of coding, even though it is a small part of the skill of programming, it implies that students will learn the basics of syntax first and then gradually move on to semantics, integrated structure, and finally style.

As complicated as programming is, computer programming teaching is often based upon the traditional lecture format. However, this methodology may not be the best way to help many students actively understand underlying concepts. This paper formulates an alternative

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