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Advocacy and Allyship by Men for Women in Engineering-related Fields at the College Level

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Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

Women in Engineering Division: Panel on Advocacy and Allyship by Men for Women

Tagged Division

Women in Engineering

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

15

DOI

10.18260/1-2--36658

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/36658

Download Count

185

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Paper Authors

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Brian Kirkmeyer Miami University

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Brian Kirkmeyer is the Karen Buchwald Wright Senior Assistant Dean for Student Success and Instructor in the College of Engineering and Computing at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. His background includes BS, MS and PhD degrees in Materials Science and Engineering (specialization in polymers), the former from Purdue University and the latter two from the University of Pennsylvania. He has work experiences in automotive electronics (Delphi Automotive Systems) and consumer products (International Flavors and Fragrances) prior to his current role. He served on the executive committee of the ASEE Women in Engineering division from 2010 to present.

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Michael D. Johnson Texas A&M University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-5328-8763

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Dr. Michael D. Johnson is a professor in the Department of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution at Texas A&M University. Prior to joining the faculty at Texas A&M, he was a senior product development engineer at the 3M Corporate Research Laboratory in St. Paul, Minnesota. He received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from Michigan State University and his S.M. and Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Johnson’s research focuses on engineering education; design tools; specifically, the cost modeling and analysis of product development and manufacturing systems; and computer-aided design methodology.

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Lisa Abrams The Ohio State University

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Dr. Lisa Abrams is currently the Associate Chair for the Department of Engineering Education at The Ohio State University (OSU). She received her Bachelor's and Master's Degrees in Mechanical Engineering and PhD degree in Industrial Engineering from Ohio State. She has seven years of industry experience in the areas of Design and Consulting. Her research focuses on the recruitment, retention, and success of undergraduate students, especially those populations who are under-represented in engineering. She has developed and taught a wide variety of engineering courses in First Year Engineering and Mechanical Engineering at Ohio State. She has received numerous teaching awards in the last five years at both the College and the Departmental level at OSU.

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Roger A. Green North Dakota State University

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Roger Green received the B.S. degree in electrical and computer engineering and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Wyoming in 1992, 1994, and 1998, respectively. During his Ph.D. studies, he also obtained a graduate minor in statistics.

He is currently an Associate Professor and Undergraduate Coordinator with the Electrical and Computer Engineering department at North Dakota State University, where he teaches courses and conducts research in signal processing.

Since its inception in 2008, Dr. Green has been an active member of the NDSU Advance FORWARD Advocates, a group of male faculty dedicated to effecting departmental and institutional change in support of gender equality. As part of this group, he regularly trains men, at NDSU and other institutions, to better serve as gender equity allies.

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Lyndsey McMillon-Brown NASA Glenn Research Center

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Lyndsey McMillon-Brown is a researcher at NASA Glenn Research Center. Lyndsey earned her B.S in Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering from Miami University (2013), she then completed her M.S and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at Yale University (2019). Her dissertation work focused on developing novel materials and patterns for advanced light trapping in solar cells. Lyndsey has worked on a variety of space solar cell-related programs including thin film and organic cell development and durability studies. She is currently the Principle Investigator on a research effort to develop perovskite solar cells for space. Outside of the lab, Lyndsey is dedicated to increasing opportunities for underrepresented individuals in STEM fields.

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Sharon A. Jones P.E. University of Washington Bothell

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Sharon Jones is the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at the University of Washington Bothell. She is a licensed civil engineer with degrees from Columbia University, the University of Florida, and Carnegie Mellon University. Her research interests focus on applying decision-making methods to evaluate sustainability policies with emphases on infrastructure, developing economies, and particular industrial sectors. She is also interested in engineering pedagogy, promoting diversity in the engineering profession, and developing opportunities to bridge engineering and the liberal arts.

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Philip Ritchey Texas A&M University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-5710-8202

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Philip Ritchey is an Instructional Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University. He earned the PhD in Computer Science from Purdue University in 2015 and has been at Texas A&M ever since. He teaches introductory-level computer sciences courses as well as advanced courses in software engineering and security. Recently, he is particularly interested in K-12 computer science teacher education.

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Abstract

Diversity enables better and more creative problem solving, with greater financial impact on organizations, according to multiple studies in the past 10 years. One long-standing limitation on diversity in the engineering, computing, and technology fields is the persistently-low representation of women. This is often seen in the collegiate environment more than in the professional world, and greater efforts need to be made among students and faculty to address it. Most succinctly, more men need to directly involve themselves as advocates for and allies of women. This panel engages with professionals of both binary gender identities who currently ally and advocate for women in engineering, computing, and technology fields. The goals of the panel are to identify common reasons why men should advocate for women, create support around the simple actions that can be taken in advocacy, and encourage greater allyship for women in the academic world and beyond. The panelists include both men and women from across multiple intersectional identities. The questions include (1) for what reasons are you an ally or advocate for women in engineering-related fields, (2) what experiences have you had in which you have had to take immediate action as an advocate or ally, (3) what do you recommend for easy-to-implement actions to advocate, and (4) how can advocates and allies help implement change at their own institutions. For the paper, each panelist would be asked these questions and their answers would be provided unedited, followed by a summary discussion of actionable items. Existing resources regarding allyship will also be presented. For the panel presentation session, each panelist will have the opportunity to highlight aspects of their answers that bring life to their thoughts to each question and together with other members of the panel can build for an in-depth discussion.

Kirkmeyer, B., & Johnson, M. D., & Abrams, L., & Green, R. A., & McMillon-Brown, L., & Jones, S. A., & Ritchey, P. (2021, July), Advocacy and Allyship by Men for Women in Engineering-related Fields at the College Level Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. 10.18260/1-2--36658

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