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Assessing Students' Global and Contextual Competencies: Three Categories of Methods used to Assess a Program with Coursework and International Modules

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Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2018

Conference Session

International Educational Experiences (2)

Tagged Division

International

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/27622

Download Count

16

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Paper Authors

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David B. Knight Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-4576-2490

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David Knight is an Assistant Professor and Director of International Engagement in the Department of Engineering Education and affiliate faculty with the Higher Education Program, Center for Human-Computer Interaction, and Human-Centered Design Program. His research focuses on student learning outcomes in undergraduate engineering, learning analytics approaches to improve educational practices and policies, interdisciplinary teaching and learning, organizational change in colleges and universities, and international issues in higher education.

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Kirsten A. Davis Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

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Kirsten is a PhD student in Engineering Education at Virginia Tech, where she also completed her master's degree in Higher Education. She has previously worked in industry in the field of IT analytics and has experience with corporate recruiting. Her primary research interests are engineering study abroad, developing intercultural competency in engineering students, and international higher education.

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Timothy Kinoshita Virginia Tech

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Timothy Kinoshita is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Engineering Education at Virginia Tech. His research interests include graduate education, curriculum development, faculty development, global engineering education, and education policy.

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Michelle Soledad Virginia Tech, Ateneo de Davao University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-2491-6684

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Michelle Soledad is a doctoral student in Engineering Education at Virginia Tech. Her research interests include faculty development and data-informed reflective practice. Ms. Soledad has degrees in Electrical Engineering (BS, ME) from the Ateneo de Davao University (ADDU) in Davao City, Philippines, where she continues to be a faculty member of the Electrical Engineering Department. She also served as Department Chair and was a member of the University Research Council before pursuing doctoral studies. Prior to joining ADDU, Ms. Soledad was a Senior Team Lead for Accenture, where she worked on and managed systems maintenance and enhancement projects.

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Jacob R. Grohs Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

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Jacob Grohs is an Assistant Professor in Engineering Education at Virginia Tech with Affiliate Faculty status in Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics and the Learning Sciences and Technologies at Virginia Tech. He holds degrees in Engineering Mechanics (BS, MS) and in Educational Psychology (MAEd, PhD).

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Abstract

Keywords: Global Competency; Assessment; Study abroad

Multiple reports suggest that the engineering work of the future will be conducted by globally diverse teams for globally diverse customers in which engineers will be required to communicate across political and cultural boundaries. To prepare students to enter such a workforce, engineering programs should seek to educate “global engineers” and integrate global competence across curricula. Indeed, ABET demands this emphasis, as criterion h calls for students to experience “the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.” Programs have addressed this goal in a variety of different ways by offering, for example, study abroad opportunities, classes with a global focus, co-curricular student organizations, and general education requirements. It is challenging to demonstrate, however, the impact of these kinds of interventions on the development of students’ global and contextual competencies.

This paper describes a suite of assessments that we use to uncover how students develop such competencies in a program geared toward first-year engineers. The program integrates a global engineering course meeting general education requirements with multiple tracks of short-term international experiences. Our paper provides an overview of the assessments that we use throughout the program as well as example summary results from each assessment (n=92 students for Spring 2016 data) to demonstrate the unique information gained from analyzing each measure or activity. We organize assessments into three categories based on the amount of time they require to complete and analyze so that other faculty or program leaders can gain a sense of what might work best for their settings: 1) Quick Hitters (Cultural Intelligence Survey, Sojourn Readiness Assessment, Interdisciplinary Skills Scale, Contextual Awareness Scale; Systems Thinking Scale; Critical Dispositions Scale), 2) More In-Depth (Global Competency Scenario, Systems Thinking for Engaging Problem Solvers), and 3) Longer Projects (Global Challenges posters, Working with a Global Team, International Journal, Preparing for an Interview). We hope these examples used to demonstrate course, program, or other interventions’ impacts may serve as a model for other institutions seeking to assess students’ global and contextual competencies.

Knight, D. B., & Davis, K. A., & Kinoshita, T., & Soledad, M., & Grohs, J. R. (2017, June), Assessing Students' Global and Contextual Competencies: Three Categories of Methods used to Assess a Program with Coursework and International Modules Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. https://peer.asee.org/27622

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