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Assessment of Product Archaeology as a Framework for Contextualizing Engineering Design

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Conference

2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Indianapolis, Indiana

Publication Date

June 15, 2014

Start Date

June 15, 2014

End Date

June 18, 2014

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees’ Poster Session

Tagged Division

Division Experimentation & Lab-Oriented Studies

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

18

Page Numbers

24.214.1 - 24.214.18

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/20105

Download Count

25

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Paper Authors

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Kemper Lewis University at Buffalo, SUNY

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Kemper Lewis is a Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University at Buffalo - SUNY. He is the project PI for the collaborative NSF TUES grant, "Assessment of Product Archaeology as a Framework for Contextualizing Engineering Design". The project is a collaborative effort between the University at Buffalo - SUNY, Arizona State University, Penn State University, Northwestern University, Bucknell University, and Virginia Tech.

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Deborah A. Moore-Russo University at Buffalo, SUNY

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Deborah Moore-Russo is an associate professor in the Department of Learning and Instruction in the Graduate School of Education at the University at Buffalo. Her primary research interests include spatial literacy and the use of digital technologies and physical manipulatives in engineering, science, and mathematics education.

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Ann F. McKenna Arizona State University, Polytechnic campus

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Ann F. McKenna is Professor and Chair of the Department of Engineering & Computing Systems in the College of Technology and Innovation at Arizona State University (ASU). Prior to joining ASU she served as a program director at the National Science Foundation in the Division of Undergraduate Education, and was on the faculty in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Segal Design Institute at Northwestern University. Dr. McKenna received her B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Drexel University and Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. McKenna is also currently serving as a Senior Associate Editor for the Journal of Engineering Education

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Phillip M. Cormier SUNY - University at Buffalo

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Amy M. Johnson Arizona State University

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Amy Johnson received her PhD in experimental psychology (cognitive track) in 2011 from the University of Memphis. She is currently a post-doctoral research associate at the College of Technology and Innovation at Arizona State University.

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Adam R. Carberry Arizona State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-0041-7060

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Adam R. Carberry, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor at Arizona State University in the Fulton Schools of Engineering. He earned a B.S. in Materials Science Engineering from Alfred University, and received his M.S. and Ph.D., both from Tufts University, in Chemistry and Engineering Education respectively. Dr. Carberry was previously an employee of the Tufts’ Center for Engineering Education & Outreach and manager of the Student Teacher Outreach Mentorship Program (STOMP).

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Wei Chen Northwestern University

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David W. Gatchell PhD Northwestern University

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David Gatchell, PhD, is director of the manufacturing and design engineering (MaDE) program at Northwestern University. He is also a clinical associate professor in Northwestern's Segal Design Institute, biomedical engineering department and mechanical engineering department.

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Timothy W. Simpson Pennsylvania State University, University Park

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Dr. Simpson is currently a Professor of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at Penn State with affiliations in Engineering Design and the College of Information Sciences & Technology. He received his Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Georgia Tech in 1998 and 1995, and his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Cornell University in 1994. His research interests include product family and product platform design, product dissection, multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO), and additive manufacturing, and he has published over 250 peer-reviewed papers to date. He teaches courses on Product Family Design, Concurrent Engineering, Mechanical Systems Design, and Product Dissection, and he serves as the Director of the Product Realization Minor in the College of Engineering. He is a recipient of the ASEE Fred Merryfield Design Award and a NSF Career Award. He has received several awards for outstanding research and teaching at Penn State, including the 2007 Penn State University President’s Award for Excellence in Academic Integration. He is a Fellow in ASME and an Associate Fellow in AIAA. He currently serves on the ASME Design Education Division Executive Committee and is former Chair of both the ASME Design Automation Executive Committee and the AIAA MDO Technical Committee. He is also a Department Editor for IIE Transactions: Design & Manufacturing and serves on the editorial boards for Research in Engineering Design, Journal of Engineering Design, and Engineering Optimization.

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Conrad Tucker Pennsylvania State University, University Park

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Gül E. Okudan Kremer Pennsylvania State University, University Park

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Sarah E. Zappe Pennsylvania State University, University Park

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Dr. Sarah Zappe is Research Associate and Director of Assessment and Instructional Support in the Leonhard Center for the Enhancement of Engineering Education at Penn State. She holds a doctoral degree in educational psychology emphasizing applied measurement and testing. In her position, Sarah is responsible for developing instructional support programs for faculty, providing evaluation support for educational proposals and projects, and working with faculty to publish educational research. Her research interests primarily involve creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship education.

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Steven B. Shooter Bucknell University

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Steve Shooter is a professor of Mechanical Engineering at Bucknell University.

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Charles Kim Bucknell University

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Charles Kim is an associate professor of mechanical engineering at Bucknell University. He received Ph.D. and M.S.E. degrees from the University of Michigan and B.S. from Caltech. Prof. Kim teaches courses in design and innovation and is currently director of the Innovation, Design, Entrepreneurship, Applications, and Systems program at Bucknell.

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Christopher B. Williams Virginia Tech

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Lisa D. McNair Virginia Tech

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Lisa D. McNair is an Associate Professor of Engineering Education at Virginia Tech, where she also serves as Assistant Department Head of Graduate Programs and co-Director of the VT Engineering Communication Center (VTECC). She received her PhD in Linguistics from the University of Chicago and a B.A. in English from the University of Georgia. Her research interests include interdisciplinary collaboration, design education, communication studies, identity theory and reflective practice. Projects supported by the National Science Foundation include interdisciplinary pedagogy for pervasive computing design; writing across the curriculum in Statics courses; as well as a CAREER award to explore the use of e-portfolios to promote professional identity and reflective practice. Her teaching emphasizes the roles of engineers as communicators and educators, the foundations and evolution of the engineering education discipline, assessment methods, and evaluating communication in engineering.

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Marie C. Paretti Virginia Tech Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-2202-6928

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Marie C. Paretti is an Associate Professor of Engineering Education at Virginia Tech, where she co-directs the Virginia Tech Engineering Communications Center (VTECC). Her research focuses on communication in engineering design, interdisciplinary communication and collaboration, design education, and gender in engineering. She was awarded a CAREER grant from the National Science Foundation to study expert teaching in capstone design courses, and is co-PI on numerous NSF grants exploring communication, design, and identity in engineering. Drawing on theories of situated learning and identity development, her work includes studies on the teaching and learning of communication, effective teaching practices in design education, the effects of differing design pedagogies on retention and motivation, the dynamics of cross-disciplinary collaboration in both academic and industry design environments, and gender and identity in engineering.

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Joe Tranquillo Bucknell University

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Joe Tranquillo teaches at Bucknell University, offering courses in signals and systems, neural and cardiac electrophysiology, instrumentation and medical device design. He has published widely on electrical dynamics in the heart and brain, biomedical computing, engineering design and engineering education.

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Abstract

Assessment of Product Archaeology as a Framework for Contextualizing Engineering DesignProduct archaeology is used as an educational framework for promoting students’ considerationof the broader impacts of engineering on people, economics, and the environment. Engineeringeducators require instructional methods which can develop students’ understanding of “theimpact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context”needed to meet ABET’s Criteria 3, Outcome h. Furthermore, educators need tools which canreliably assess students’ understanding of the broader contexts of engineering design. Theproduct archaeology framework integrates concepts and techniques from traditional archaeologywith product dissection. Students are instructed to carefully examine man-made products tounderstand how design decisions are informed by and bring about broader impacts on people,economics, and the environment.Product archaeology activities offer students an opportunity to reconstruct the lifecycle of aproduct, including the customer requirements, design specifications, and manufacturingprocesses used to produce it. This process is in an effort to understand the decisions that led to aproduct’s development. This paper describes: 1) the identification and development ofassessment tools for evaluating the impact of product archaeology; 2) the implementation of theproduct archaeology framework during two academic semesters in engineering departments atsix universities; and 3) assessment results with evidence of the effectiveness of the productarchaeology framework. This project uses existing survey instruments, including the Engineer of2020 survey and the engineering design self-efficacy instrument to assess positive studentattitudes and perceptions about engineering. Our assessment plan also uses two newly-developeddesign scenarios. These scenarios require students to respond to open-ended descriptions of real-world engineering problems to assess students’ ability to extend and refine knowledge of broadercontexts. Emerging pre-test/post-test data reveals that the product archaeology activities lead tomore positive student ratings of their own knowledge of broader contexts and self-efficacy aboutengineering design. Analysis of the design scenarios (used to assess students’ ability to applycontextual knowledge to engineering design situations) is underway and will include results fromthe Spring and Fall 2013 semesters.

Lewis, K., & Moore-Russo, D. A., & McKenna, A. F., & Cormier, P. M., & Johnson, A. M., & Carberry, A. R., & Chen, W., & Gatchell, D. W., & Simpson, T. W., & Tucker, C., & Okudan Kremer, G. E., & Zappe, S. E., & Shooter, S. B., & Kim, C., & Williams, C. B., & McNair, L. D., & Paretti, M. C., & Tranquillo, J. (2014, June), Assessment of Product Archaeology as a Framework for Contextualizing Engineering Design Paper presented at 2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Indianapolis, Indiana. https://peer.asee.org/20105

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