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Basic Vibration Design To Which Young Engineers Can Relate: The Washing Machine

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Conference

1999 Annual Conference

Location

Charlotte, North Carolina

Publication Date

June 20, 1999

Start Date

June 20, 1999

End Date

June 23, 1999

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

4.104.1 - 4.104.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/7851

Download Count

1274

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Paper Authors

author page

Kip P. Nygren

author page

Wayne Whiteman

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 3268

Basic Vibration Design to Which Young Engineers Can Relate: The Washing Machine Lieutenant Colonel Wayne E. Whiteman, Colonel Kip P. Nygren United States Military Academy, West Point, New York

Abstract

A first course in vibration engineering is typically a content based, engineer science offering with limited time and resources for engineering design. This paper offers one example of an early design project in vibration engineering with strong instructional content that enhances the learning environment. It is crafted in a manner that is within the student’s capability to complete, yet offers a taste of the interesting applications that lie ahead in their engineering education.

I. Introduction

Typical early undergraduate vibration courses focus on background theory that is used in later, more senior-level design projects and course work in the engineering curriculum. Our experience is that students are motivated at all levels of learning by real world problems that demonstrate relevance of the material. The challenge is to craft design projects at this early stage in the engineering student’s career that are within their capabilities to complete, yet offer a taste of the interesting engineering applications that lie ahead.

A first course in vibration engineering is historically a content based, engineer science offering with limited time and resources for engineering design. Our goal is to introduce the design process in a manner that compliments the course material. Our students take this course prior to a formal offering in design morphology. Despite this possible shortcoming, we find that problem formulation and analysis, search for alternative solutions, decision making, and documentation with specification of results can all be accomplished without formal design training.1

II. Design in Engineering Science Courses

Not all of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) defined fundamental elements of design are included in this process. Often, time constraints in the engineering science requirements can preclude some areas of full construction, testing, and evaluation. Despite the observation, we find it extremely beneficial to include as many design components as possible. Our desire is to promote student creativity in a meaningful design experience that allows optimal mentoring opportunities.

Nygren, K. P., & Whiteman, W. (1999, June), Basic Vibration Design To Which Young Engineers Can Relate: The Washing Machine Paper presented at 1999 Annual Conference, Charlotte, North Carolina. https://peer.asee.org/7851

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