Asee peer logo

Board # 132 : Selection Process of Students for a Novel STEM Summer Bridge Program

Download Paper |

Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2017

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/27735

Download Count

59

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Margaret E. Beier Rice University

visit author page

Margaret Beier is an Associate Professor of Psychology at Rice University in Houston, TX. She received her B.A. from Colby College, and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Margaret’s research examines the predictors of performance in educational and occupational settings. In particular, she is interested in the effects of examining gender, age, ability, personality, motivation, and self-regulation on a range of outcomes. She is a member of the American Educational Research Association and a Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychologists.

visit author page

biography

Ann Saterbak Rice University

visit author page

Ann Saterbak is a Professor in the Practice in the Biomedical Engineering Department at Duke University. She taught at Rice University from 1999 to 2017. At Rice, Saterbak introduced problem-based learning in the School of Engineering and more recently launched a successful first-year engineering design course taught in the Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen. Saterbak is the lead author of the textbook, Bioengineering Fundamentals. Saterbak’s outstanding teaching was recognized at Rice through university-wide and departmental teaching awards. In 2013, Saterbak received the ASEE Biomedical Engineering Division Theo C. Pilkington Outstanding Educator Award. For her contribution to education within biomedical engineering, she was elected Fellow in the Biomedical Engineering Society and the American Society of Engineering Education.

visit author page

biography

Megan McSpedon

visit author page

Megan McSpedon is the Associate Director of the Rice Emerging Scholars Program. She has been with the program since it was founded in 2012. Megan received a B.A. in English from Rice University.

visit author page

biography

Michael Wolf Rice University

visit author page

Michael Wolf is Professor of Mathematics at Rice University as well as Faculty Director of the Rice Emerging Scholars Program, an initiative he co-founded in 2012. The Rice Emerging Scholars program is a collection of interventions, beginning the summer before matriculation and extending for at least 2 years and often more, for a group of matriculating Rice STEM students whose preparation for STEM is weaker than those of their peers. All identified obstructions to success are addressed, beginning with a bridge program built around the most difficult scientific topics the students will meet as freshmen.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

This NSF Grantee Poster explores the selection process for Rice University’s Emerging Scholar Program (RESP). Developed in June 2012, RESP is a comprehensive summer bridge and term-time advising program aimed at increasing STEM retention, graduation, and achievement in promising students who attended under-resourced high schools. RESP is not a remedial program, nor even an ‘early college course’ program. Rather, RESP aims to target deficits in K-12 preparation that may create undue obstructions for the program’s participants (named Scholars in the program and this paper) compared to their peers. The objective of the non-credit summer bridge portion of the program is to prepare Scholars for the pace, rigor, and depth of the STEM curriculum at Rice University. This is achieved through exposure to the most challenging portions of freshman calculus, chemistry, and physics with special focus on complex word problems. During subsequent years, Scholars receive intensive and intrusive term-time advising from staff devoted to the program.

RESP Scholars are admitted to Rice through the regular admissions process. After accepting a spot in the entering class, these students are invited to attend the bridge program in the summer before their freshman year. Scholar admittance occurs independent of consideration for, or participation in, RESP. Scholars are selected through partnerships with Rice’s Office of Admissions and other groups on campus. RESP partners with the Office of Admissions to review student admission information including SAT/ACT test scores, SAT subject test scores, first-generation status, academic ambitions and high school competitiveness ranking.

A separate principal selection mechanism for RESP is a novel diagnostic exam created in conjunction with the Schools of Natural Sciences and Engineering. The 11-question exam covers conceptual knowledge and tests skills in mathematics, chemistry, and physics with quantitative word problems that students are expected to know prior to arrival at Rice University. By focusing on applied problems and conceptual knowledge, the exam demonstrates a student’s academic preparation, not their intellectual ability.

The current study examines the validity of the RESP diagnostic exam and its predictive validity relative to standardized tests with a sample of students (N = 976) who matriculated into Rice University from 2012 to 2014. The RESP diagnostic exam was related to grades, and we found that the correlation between the RESP diagnostic exam and grades was greater for STEM grades than non-STEM grades. We found that the diagnostic exam accounted for an incremental 9% of variance in STEM grades above SAT performance, but only 1% of incremental variance above SAT in non-STEM grades. Moreover, we found evidence of range restriction for both SAT and RESP diagnostic exam performance for Rice University matriculants, further suggesting the utility of the diagnostic exam is at the lower end of the distribution. In summary, our results suggest that an additional diagnostic exam written by schools to specifically measure STEM preparation for their program can be a useful addition to procedures for selecting students for special experiences such as summer bridge programs.

Beier, M. E., & Saterbak, A., & McSpedon, M., & Wolf, M. (2017, June), Board # 132 : Selection Process of Students for a Novel STEM Summer Bridge Program Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. https://peer.asee.org/27735

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2017 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015