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Board 159: Gender Differences in 7th Grade Students' Interest in STEM After Participating in a Solenoid Instructional Unit

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topics

Diversity and NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

6

DOI

10.18260/1-2--32277

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/32277

Download Count

165

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Paper Authors

biography

Tandra Tyler-Wood University of North Texas

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Dr. Tandra Tyler-Wood is professor and department chair of Learning Technologies in the College of Information at the University of North Texas. Her research interests include issues with equity in STEM education and careers.

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biography

Daniella Smith University of North Texas

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Daniella Smith, Ph.D. is an associate professor in the Department of Information Science at the University of North Texas. Her research interests include STEM education in K-12 schools, the information seeking behaviors of youth, and technology integration in schools.

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Karen R. Johnson University of North Texas Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-9900-6650

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Abstract

Research indicates that women are generally underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programs, with specific mention of consistently low growth levels in engineering (Kanny, Sax, & Riggers-Piehl, 2014). According to the National Center for Education Statistics, over the past 25 years, there has been only a slight increase (14% to 17%) in the percentage of women receiving bachelor’s degrees in engineering (Aud, Hussar, Johnson et al., 2012) and only 11% of all engineers are women (National Science Foundation, Division of Science Resources Statistics, 2011).

Although female performance in STEM related subjects in elementary education are generally comparable to males or even higher (Stoet & Geary, 2018; Wang, Degol, & Fe, 2015), women are noted to have a higher exit rate in the science and engineering fields (Hunt 2016). Women’s underrepresentation in engineering can be partly explained by dissatisfaction with pay, advancement opportunities, work conditions, hours of long work, family commitments (Hunt, 2016), perceived organizational support and occupational commitment (Fouad, Singh, Capaert, Chang, & Wan, 2016).

This NSF ITEST funded research reviews the achievement scores of male and female students after participating in a unit focused on developing a solenoid unit. Gender differences in Affinity towards STEM and a career in STEM are also examined. Clearly, it is important to identify and research factors that impact girls’ decision to participate in STEM classes and careers. Curriculum needs to be examined to determine if it not only raises students’ test scores but also provides a stimulus to pursue a career in STEM.

Tyler-Wood, T., & Smith, D., & Johnson, K. R. (2019, June), Board 159: Gender Differences in 7th Grade Students' Interest in STEM After Participating in a Solenoid Instructional Unit Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. 10.18260/1-2--32277

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