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Board # 50: Defining the Frontiers of Bioengineering Education at Illinois and Beyond

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Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2017

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/27871

Download Count

134

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Paper Authors

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Jennifer R Amos University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

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Dr Amos joined the Bioengineering Department at the University of Illinois in 2009 and is currently a Teaching Associate Professor in Bioengineering and an Adjunct Associate Professor in Educational Psychology. She received her B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Texas Tech and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from University of South Carolina. She completed a Fulbright Program at Ecole Centrale de Lille in France to benchmark and help create a new hybrid masters program combining medicine and engineering and also has led multiple curricular initiative in Bioengineering and the College of Engineering on several NSF funded projects.

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Rashid Bashir University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

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Rashid Bashir completed his Ph.D. from Purdue University in Oct. 1992. From Oct. 1992 to Oct. 1998, he worked at National Semiconductor in the Analog/Mixed Signal Process Technology Development Group, where he was promoted to Sr. Engineering Manager. At National Semiconductor, he led the development and commercialization of 4 analog semiconductor process technologies. He joined Purdue University in Oct. 1998 as an Assistant Professor and was later promoted to Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a Courtesy Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. Since Oct. 2007, he joined the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and was the Abel Bliss Professor of Engineering, and Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering & Bioengineering. He was the Director of the Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory (mntl.illinois.edu), a campus-wide clean room facility from Oct 2007 to Aug 2013 and the Co-Director of the campus-wide Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (www.cnst.illinois.edu), a “collaboratory” aimed at facilitating center grants and large initiatives around campus in the area of nanotechnology. Since Aug 2013, he has been the head of the Bioengineering Department. In Oct 2016, he was named the Grainger Distinguished Chair in Engineering. From Jan 2017, he is the Interim Vice Dean of the new Carle-Illinois ‘Engineering Based’ College of Medicine at UIUC.
He has authored or co-authored over 200 journal papers, over 200 conference papers and conference abstracts, over 100 invited talks, and has been granted 42 patents. He is a fellow of 6 international professional societies (IEEE, AIMBE, AAAS, APS, IAMBE, and BMES). His research interests include bionanotechnology, BioMEMS, lab on a chip, interfacing of biology and engineering from the molecular to the tissue scale, and applications of semiconductor fabrication to biomedical engineering, all applied to solving biomedical problems. Prof. Bashir’s key technical contributions and achievements lie in the area of BioMEMS and biomedical nanotechnology, especially in the use of electrical- or mechanical-based label-free methods for detection of biological entities on a chip. In addition, he has also made key contributions to 3-D fabrication methods that can be used for tissue engineering and development of cellular systems. He has been involved in 3 startups that have licensed his technologies (BioVitesse, Inc., Daktari Diagnostics, and most recently Prenosis, Inc.).

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Kelly J Cross University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

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Dr. Cross completed her doctoral program in the Engineering Education department at Virginia Tech in 2015 and worked as a post-doctoral researcher with the Illinois Foundry for Innovation in Engineering Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. At UIUC she has collaborated with multiple teams of engineering faculty on implementing and assessing instructional innovation. Dr. Cross is currently a Research Scientist in the Department of Bioengineering working to redesign the curriculum through the NSF funded Revolutionizing Engineering Departments (RED) grant. She is a member of the ASEE Leadership Virtual Community of Practice that organizes and facilitates Safe Zone Training workshops. Dr. Cross has conducted multiple workshops on managing personal bias in STEM, both online and in-person. Dr. Cross’ scholarship investigated student teams in engineering, faculty communities of practice, and the intersectionality of multiple identity dimensions. Her research interests include diversity and inclusion in STEM, teamwork and communication skills, assessment, and identity construction.

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Geoffrey L Herman University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-9501-2295

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Dr. Geoffrey L. Herman is a teaching assistant professor with the Deprartment of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He also has a courtesy appointment as a research assistant professor with the Department of Curriculum & Instruction. He earned his Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as a Mavis Future Faculty Fellow and conducted postdoctoral research with Ruth Streveler in the School of Engineering Education at Purdue University. His research interests include creating systems for sustainable improvement in engineering education, conceptual change and development in engineering students, and change in faculty beliefs about teaching and learning. He serves as the Publications Chair for the ASEE Educational Research and Methods Division.

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Jeffrey Loewenstein University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

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Marcia Pool University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

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Dr. Marcia Pool is a Lecturer in bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In her career, Marcia has been active in improving undergraduate education through developing problem-based laboratories to enhance experimental design skills; developing a preliminary design course focused on problem identification and market space (based on an industry partner’s protocol); and mentoring and guiding student teams through the senior design capstone course and a translational course following senior design. To promote biomedical/bioengineering, Marcia works with Women in Engineering to offer outreach activities and is engaged at the national level as Executive Director of the biomedical engineering honor society, Alpha Eta Mu Beta.

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Dorothy Silverman University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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Abstract

Catalyzed by the Grinter Report, engineering education was previously revolutionized by aligning its practice and education with science. This alignment created a social-technical duality in engineering where the technical skills were elevated, social skills were relegated. In response, calls have risen for holistic training of engineering students who understand the societal needs and the societal implications of their practice. Our NSF-sponsored Revolutionizing Engineering Departments project was conceived as one potential solution to this challenge. In this project, we are revolutionizing our department by realigning our curriculum with healthcare and medicine, contexts that require the integration of social and technical expertise.

Inequities driven by rising costs of healthcare, the increased role of technology in medicine, and ethical dilemmas driven by increases in population and age-related diseases, all necessitate that engineers and healthcare providers both respond to these urgent societal needs by employing available scientific knowledge to derive solutions for complex systems that are not yet fully understood. These disciplines must precede and drive science by translating social needs into technical problems. We need to determine how to provide “higher quality healthcare to more people at lower cost” and train bioengineering leaders of tomorrow to drive “Moore’s law for health care.” In our revolution, we are aligning our Bioengineering Department with medical practice and education by driving our curriculum around the simple message of “no solution without a need.” While traditional engineering curricula are organized around scientific principles (e.g., signals and systems) or technologies (e.g., imaging), our new curriculum will be organized around the physician and patient needs (e.g., diagnosing pathologies and pain management, respectively) that necessitate the science and technology.

In this paper, we will describe the challenges (needs) that are driving our revolution and then describe the objectives that we are undertaking to address those challenges. We have identified four challenges that necessitate our revolution: 1) Students trained with a focus on only technical capabilities will be unprepared to meet the societal challenges facing bioengineers, 2) Given the interdisciplinary nature of bioengineering, students often lack the opportunities to develop deep technical expertise, 3) An inflexible curriculum stifles creativity and passionate pursuits, keeping students and faculty from deeply engaging in undergraduate research, internships, study-abroad, or clinical experiences, and 4) A forthcoming engineering-based College of Medicine (CoM) on our campus will render our current model of instruction and teaching assignments unsustainable as our bioengineering faculty will teach in the new CoM. Our revolution will have four objectives for our undergraduate program: 1) redesign the curriculum so that societal needs for healthcare and medicine drive the technical content, 2) integrate co-curricular experiences providing insight to the clinical needs and challenges from the freshmen year, 3) translate medical assessment practices to align clinical experiences with the curriculum, and 4) develop our faculty’s teaching skills to meet these new challenges by engaging their intrinsic motivations to revolutionize the department. We will particularly focus on describing our preliminary efforts toward creating the clinical immersion experiences for first-year students that will satisfy the first two objectives.

Amos, J. R., & Bashir, R., & Cross, K. J., & Herman, G. L., & Loewenstein, J., & Pool, M., & Silverman, D. (2017, June), Board # 50: Defining the Frontiers of Bioengineering Education at Illinois and Beyond Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. https://peer.asee.org/27871

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